Wrestling with wicked problems? The value of business plan competitions to social entrepreneurship education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In this work we present an account of our experiences with a group of graduate students studying social entrepreneurship at Master’s level. They participated in a prominent international business plan competition which challenges students to come up with a solution to a significant real world problem. We facilitated the process of their involvement with the support of a visiting colleague to identify what the students thought was a workable solution. Our students learned about the nature, scale and complexity of so-called ‘wicked problems’ and potential solutions. We consider that practice-based co-curricular activities are not an easy option for faculty: that students need extensive support, and while they can gain significant learning from such experiences, we consider that learning outcomes are best enhanced through students working closely with those with a deep, contextualised familiarity of context in order to co-produce integrated solutions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership
Volume10
Issue number2
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 31 May 2019

Fingerprint

Integrated solutions
Wicked problems
Social entrepreneurship
Learning outcomes
Nature
Business plan
Graduate students
International business
Entrepreneurship education
Familiarity

Keywords

  • social entrepreneurship
  • business plan
  • graduate students

Cite this

@article{ac403a9bc19247929f5b0ac3eda127ba,
title = "Wrestling with wicked problems? The value of business plan competitions to social entrepreneurship education",
abstract = "In this work we present an account of our experiences with a group of graduate students studying social entrepreneurship at Master’s level. They participated in a prominent international business plan competition which challenges students to come up with a solution to a significant real world problem. We facilitated the process of their involvement with the support of a visiting colleague to identify what the students thought was a workable solution. Our students learned about the nature, scale and complexity of so-called ‘wicked problems’ and potential solutions. We consider that practice-based co-curricular activities are not an easy option for faculty: that students need extensive support, and while they can gain significant learning from such experiences, we consider that learning outcomes are best enhanced through students working closely with those with a deep, contextualised familiarity of context in order to co-produce integrated solutions.",
keywords = "social entrepreneurship, business plan, graduate students",
author = "Simon Teasdale and Artur Steiner and Michael Roy",
note = "Acceptance in SAN Unknown publisher policy - made file open and contacted publisher via web form 29-7-19 ET",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "31",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
number = "2",

}

Wrestling with wicked problems? The value of business plan competitions to social entrepreneurship education. / Teasdale, Simon; Steiner, Artur; Roy, Michael.

In: Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership , Vol. 10, No. 2, 31.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Wrestling with wicked problems? The value of business plan competitions to social entrepreneurship education

AU - Teasdale, Simon

AU - Steiner, Artur

AU - Roy, Michael

N1 - Acceptance in SAN Unknown publisher policy - made file open and contacted publisher via web form 29-7-19 ET

PY - 2019/5/31

Y1 - 2019/5/31

N2 - In this work we present an account of our experiences with a group of graduate students studying social entrepreneurship at Master’s level. They participated in a prominent international business plan competition which challenges students to come up with a solution to a significant real world problem. We facilitated the process of their involvement with the support of a visiting colleague to identify what the students thought was a workable solution. Our students learned about the nature, scale and complexity of so-called ‘wicked problems’ and potential solutions. We consider that practice-based co-curricular activities are not an easy option for faculty: that students need extensive support, and while they can gain significant learning from such experiences, we consider that learning outcomes are best enhanced through students working closely with those with a deep, contextualised familiarity of context in order to co-produce integrated solutions.

AB - In this work we present an account of our experiences with a group of graduate students studying social entrepreneurship at Master’s level. They participated in a prominent international business plan competition which challenges students to come up with a solution to a significant real world problem. We facilitated the process of their involvement with the support of a visiting colleague to identify what the students thought was a workable solution. Our students learned about the nature, scale and complexity of so-called ‘wicked problems’ and potential solutions. We consider that practice-based co-curricular activities are not an easy option for faculty: that students need extensive support, and while they can gain significant learning from such experiences, we consider that learning outcomes are best enhanced through students working closely with those with a deep, contextualised familiarity of context in order to co-produce integrated solutions.

KW - social entrepreneurship

KW - business plan

KW - graduate students

M3 - Article

VL - 10

IS - 2

ER -