What chance of a more gender equal Scotland? Critical frame analysis of policy proposals in the IndyRef and beyond

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

A significant by-product of the Scottish Independence Referendum debate was the flourishing of proposals across a range of public policy domains. From the Scottish Government’s White Paper to the propositions of Common Weal, the formal parties and their various commissions, and the informal groups in between, taxation, welfare reform, childcare and social care, corporate representation among other policy areas featured in formal policy documents. Using CFA, this paper analyses the extent to which these policy proposals were framed as advancing women’s social, economic and political independence and the extent to which policy and political institutions demonstrated a failure to mainstream gender analysis in public policy formulation despite the political and discursive opportunities offered by structural change.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2015

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public policy
informal group
political independence
policy area
gender
referendum
political institution
taxation
structural change
social economics
welfare
reform

Keywords

  • women
  • Scotland
  • independence

Cite this

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