"We don't really have cause to discuss these things, they don't affect us": a collaborative model for developing culturally appropriate sexual health services with the Bangladeshi community of Tower Hamlets

Andrew Beck*, A. Majumdar, C. Estcourt, J. Petrak

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To identify barriers to accessing sexual health care among the Bangladeshi community of east London and to develop a model of community participation in service development.
Methods: Qualitative study using one to one interviews with sexual health service users plus focus groups in community settings.
Results: 58 people participated in the study, 12 in individual interviews and the remainder in six focus groups. All were of Bangladeshi origin. Four main themes were reported as impacting on access to services; confidentiality concerns, relevance of services to the community, problems with discussing sexual issues, and problems with previous experiences of health promotion. Community values regarding sex outside of marriage were an important underlying factor in participants' responses. Existing sexual health services were seen as culturally insensitive by patients and community groups.
Conclusions: Community based health initiatives among hard to reach ethnic minority groups should use existing networks of statutory and non-statutory groups to benefit from local expertise and relationships. Steering groups composed of members of the local communities served by the clinic can usefully inform service development.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-162
Number of pages5
JournalSexually Transmitted Infections
Volume81
Issue number2
Early online date30 Mar 2005
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

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