Visual deficits in amblyopia constrain normal models of second-order motion processing

A.J. Simmers, T. Ledgeway, C.V. Hutchinson, Pamela Jane Knox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It is well established that amblyopes exhibit deficits in processing first-order (luminance-defined) patterns. This is readily manifest by measuring spatiotemporal sensitivity (i.e. the “window of visibility”) to moving luminance gratings. However the window of visibility to moving second-order (texture-defined) patterns has not been systematically studied in amblyopia. To address this issue monocular modulation sensitivity (1/threshold) to first-order motion and four different varieties of second-order motion (modulations of either the contrast, flicker, size or orientation of visual noise) was measured over a five-octave range of spatial and temporal frequencies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2008-2020
Number of pages13
JournalVision Research
Volume51
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011

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Amblyopia
Noise

Keywords

  • vision sciences
  • amblyopia
  • motion processing

Cite this

Simmers, A.J. ; Ledgeway, T. ; Hutchinson, C.V. ; Knox, Pamela Jane. / Visual deficits in amblyopia constrain normal models of second-order motion processing. In: Vision Research. 2011 ; Vol. 51, No. 18. pp. 2008-2020.
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Visual deficits in amblyopia constrain normal models of second-order motion processing. / Simmers, A.J.; Ledgeway, T.; Hutchinson, C.V.; Knox, Pamela Jane.

In: Vision Research, Vol. 51, No. 18, 09.2011, p. 2008-2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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