Use of safety syringes for administration of local anaesthesia among a sample of UK primary care dental professionals

K. Trayner*, M. Nguyen, L. Hopps, M. Christie, K. Roy, J. Bagg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Safer sharps devices (SSDs) are commercially available and their use is mandated through UK legislation. Aim To identify the current usage of SSDs in UK primary care dentistry. Method A cross-sectional survey was administered to delegates at the 2017 British Dental Association (BDA) Conference and Exhibition in Manchester, and at the 2017 BDA Scottish Conference and Exhibition in Glasgow. The survey covered a range of questions relating to sharps injuries and use of traditional and safety syringes for delivery of local anaesthesia. Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS Version 22 (IBM Corp., 2013) and included chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests. Results Seven hundred and ninety-six delegates participated, of whom 396 (49.7%) were using safety syringes for delivery of local anaesthesia. Of the 166 participants who had experienced a sharps injury in the past year, 76 (45.8%) worked in facilities that most commonly used SSDs for delivery of local anaesthesia. Conclusion Our results indicate that a significant number of dental practices in our sample have not adopted SSDs and suggest sharps injuries are still being sustained in some practices using SSDs. Further epidemiological research is required to provide strong evidence for the effectiveness of SSDs and reasons why SSDs have not been fully adopted in UK primary dental care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)957-961
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Dental Journal
Volume225
Issue number10
Early online date23 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • safety syringes
  • dental professionals
  • anaesthesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

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