Upright time and sit-to-stand transition progression after total hip arthroplasty: an in-hospital longitudinal study

Artaban Johnson Jeldi, Margaret Grant, David J. Allen, Angela H. Deakin, David McDonald, Ben W. Stansfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background
Although early mobilization in hospital is a key element of post–total hip arthroplasty rehabilitation, it is poorly documented.

Methods
To gain quantitative insight into inhospital mobilization, upright times and sit-to-stand transitions (STS) were measured using a thigh-mounted movement sensor in 44 participants (13 males and 31 females), age 50 to 82 years, in an observational, postsurgery, inhospital, longitudinal study.

Results
Some participants performed no activity in the first 24 hours after surgery. However, in the last 24 hours before discharge, participants performed a median of 40 (interquartile range [IQR], 15) STS and spent 134 minutes (IQR, 74 minutes) upright. Activity in rehabilitation constituted 19.4% (IQR, 15.8%) of STS and 13.3% (IQR, 5.5%) of upright time. Females spent longer in hospital (80 hours; IQR, 24) compared to males (54 hours; IQR, 26).

Conclusion
Although there was considerable activity within rehabilitation periods, a large majority of STS and upright time occurred outside rehabilitation. Within the last 24 hours in hospital, all participants were upright for prolonged periods and completed numerous STS.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)735–739
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume31
Issue number3
Early online date24 Sep 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016

Fingerprint

Arthroplasty
Longitudinal Studies
Hip
Rehabilitation
Early Ambulation
Thigh

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • sit-to-stand transitions
  • upright time
  • total hip arthroplasty
  • rehabilitation

Cite this

Jeldi, Artaban Johnson ; Grant, Margaret ; Allen, David J. ; Deakin, Angela H. ; McDonald, David ; Stansfield, Ben W. / Upright time and sit-to-stand transition progression after total hip arthroplasty: an in-hospital longitudinal study. In: Journal of Arthroplasty. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 3. pp. 735–739.
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abstract = "BackgroundAlthough early mobilization in hospital is a key element of post–total hip arthroplasty rehabilitation, it is poorly documented.MethodsTo gain quantitative insight into inhospital mobilization, upright times and sit-to-stand transitions (STS) were measured using a thigh-mounted movement sensor in 44 participants (13 males and 31 females), age 50 to 82 years, in an observational, postsurgery, inhospital, longitudinal study.ResultsSome participants performed no activity in the first 24 hours after surgery. However, in the last 24 hours before discharge, participants performed a median of 40 (interquartile range [IQR], 15) STS and spent 134 minutes (IQR, 74 minutes) upright. Activity in rehabilitation constituted 19.4{\%} (IQR, 15.8{\%}) of STS and 13.3{\%} (IQR, 5.5{\%}) of upright time. Females spent longer in hospital (80 hours; IQR, 24) compared to males (54 hours; IQR, 26).ConclusionAlthough there was considerable activity within rehabilitation periods, a large majority of STS and upright time occurred outside rehabilitation. Within the last 24 hours in hospital, all participants were upright for prolonged periods and completed numerous STS.",
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Upright time and sit-to-stand transition progression after total hip arthroplasty: an in-hospital longitudinal study. / Jeldi, Artaban Johnson; Grant, Margaret; Allen, David J.; Deakin, Angela H.; McDonald, David; Stansfield, Ben W.

In: Journal of Arthroplasty, Vol. 31, No. 3, 03.2016, p. 735–739.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Jeldi, Artaban Johnson

AU - Grant, Margaret

AU - Allen, David J.

AU - Deakin, Angela H.

AU - McDonald, David

AU - Stansfield, Ben W.

N1 - Acceptance from webpage

PY - 2016/3

Y1 - 2016/3

N2 - BackgroundAlthough early mobilization in hospital is a key element of post–total hip arthroplasty rehabilitation, it is poorly documented.MethodsTo gain quantitative insight into inhospital mobilization, upright times and sit-to-stand transitions (STS) were measured using a thigh-mounted movement sensor in 44 participants (13 males and 31 females), age 50 to 82 years, in an observational, postsurgery, inhospital, longitudinal study.ResultsSome participants performed no activity in the first 24 hours after surgery. However, in the last 24 hours before discharge, participants performed a median of 40 (interquartile range [IQR], 15) STS and spent 134 minutes (IQR, 74 minutes) upright. Activity in rehabilitation constituted 19.4% (IQR, 15.8%) of STS and 13.3% (IQR, 5.5%) of upright time. Females spent longer in hospital (80 hours; IQR, 24) compared to males (54 hours; IQR, 26).ConclusionAlthough there was considerable activity within rehabilitation periods, a large majority of STS and upright time occurred outside rehabilitation. Within the last 24 hours in hospital, all participants were upright for prolonged periods and completed numerous STS.

AB - BackgroundAlthough early mobilization in hospital is a key element of post–total hip arthroplasty rehabilitation, it is poorly documented.MethodsTo gain quantitative insight into inhospital mobilization, upright times and sit-to-stand transitions (STS) were measured using a thigh-mounted movement sensor in 44 participants (13 males and 31 females), age 50 to 82 years, in an observational, postsurgery, inhospital, longitudinal study.ResultsSome participants performed no activity in the first 24 hours after surgery. However, in the last 24 hours before discharge, participants performed a median of 40 (interquartile range [IQR], 15) STS and spent 134 minutes (IQR, 74 minutes) upright. Activity in rehabilitation constituted 19.4% (IQR, 15.8%) of STS and 13.3% (IQR, 5.5%) of upright time. Females spent longer in hospital (80 hours; IQR, 24) compared to males (54 hours; IQR, 26).ConclusionAlthough there was considerable activity within rehabilitation periods, a large majority of STS and upright time occurred outside rehabilitation. Within the last 24 hours in hospital, all participants were upright for prolonged periods and completed numerous STS.

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