Understanding the correlates of face-to-face and cyberbullying victimization among U.S. adolescents: a social-ecological analysis

Jun Sung Hong*, Jungup Lee, Dorothy L. Espelage, Simon C. Hunter, Desmond Upton Patton, Tyrone Rivers, Jr.

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using a national sample of 7,533 U.S. adolescents in grades 6-10, this study compares the social-ecological correlates of face-to-face and cyberbullying victimization. Results indicate that younger age, male sex, hours spent on social media, family socioeconomic status (SES; individual context), parental monitoring (family context), positive feelings about school, and perceived peer support in school (school context) were negatively associated with both forms of victimization. European American race, Hispanic/Latino race (individual), and family satisfaction (family context) were all significantly associated with less face-to-face victimization only, and school pressure (school context) was significantly associated with more face-to-face bullying. Peer groups accepted by parents (family context) were related to less cyberbullying victimization, and calling/texting friends were related to more cyberbullying victimization. Research and practice implications are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)638-663
Number of pages26
JournalViolence and Victims
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jul 2016

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • bullying
  • cyberbullying
  • social-ecological framework
  • victimization

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