The value of dementia care towards the end of life- a contingent valuation study

Nawaraj Bhattarai, Helen Mason, Ashleigh Kernohan, Marie Poole, Claire Bamford, Louise Robinson, Luke Vale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: A Dementia Nurse Specialist (DNS) is expected to improve the quality of care and support to people with dementia nearing, and at, the end of life (EoL) by facilitating some key features of care. The aim of this study was to estimate willingness‐to‐pay (WTP) values from the general public perspective, for the different levels of support that the DNS can provide.
Methods: Contingent valuation methods (CVM) were used to elicit the maximum WTP for scenarios describing different types of support provided by the DNS for end of life care in dementia. In a general population online survey, 1002 participants aged 18 years or more sampled from the United Kingdom provided valuations. Five scenarios were valued with mean WTP value calculated for each scenario along with the relationship between mean WTP and participant characteristics.
Results: The mean WTP varied across scenarios with higher values for the scenarios offering more features. Participants with some experience of dementia were willing to pay more compared with those with no experience. WTP values were higher for high income groups compared with the lowest income level (p<0.05). There was no evidence to suggest that respondent characteristics such as age, gender, family size, health utility or education status influenced the WTP values.
Conclusion: The general population values the anticipated improvement in dementia care provided by a DNS. This study will help inform judgements on interventions to improve the quality of end of life care.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Early online date24 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Jan 2020

Fingerprint

Terminal Care
Dementia
Family Health
Quality of Health Care
Population
Quality of Life
Education
Nurse Specialists

Keywords

  • contingent valuation
  • willingness to pay
  • dementia
  • end of life care
  • palliative care

Cite this

Bhattarai, Nawaraj ; Mason, Helen ; Kernohan, Ashleigh ; Poole, Marie ; Bamford, Claire ; Robinson, Louise ; Vale, Luke. / The value of dementia care towards the end of life- a contingent valuation study. In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2020.
@article{af803cacb96b49d4a8804060a97bc5ad,
title = "The value of dementia care towards the end of life- a contingent valuation study",
abstract = "Objectives: A Dementia Nurse Specialist (DNS) is expected to improve the quality of care and support to people with dementia nearing, and at, the end of life (EoL) by facilitating some key features of care. The aim of this study was to estimate willingness‐to‐pay (WTP) values from the general public perspective, for the different levels of support that the DNS can provide.Methods: Contingent valuation methods (CVM) were used to elicit the maximum WTP for scenarios describing different types of support provided by the DNS for end of life care in dementia. In a general population online survey, 1002 participants aged 18 years or more sampled from the United Kingdom provided valuations. Five scenarios were valued with mean WTP value calculated for each scenario along with the relationship between mean WTP and participant characteristics.Results: The mean WTP varied across scenarios with higher values for the scenarios offering more features. Participants with some experience of dementia were willing to pay more compared with those with no experience. WTP values were higher for high income groups compared with the lowest income level (p<0.05). There was no evidence to suggest that respondent characteristics such as age, gender, family size, health utility or education status influenced the WTP values.Conclusion: The general population values the anticipated improvement in dementia care provided by a DNS. This study will help inform judgements on interventions to improve the quality of end of life care.",
keywords = "contingent valuation, willingness to pay, dementia, end of life care, palliative care",
author = "Nawaraj Bhattarai and Helen Mason and Ashleigh Kernohan and Marie Poole and Claire Bamford and Louise Robinson and Luke Vale",
note = "Acceptance from webpage/ in SAN AAM online 7/1/20, but VoR still to be published; have therefore treated as NYP. 15/1/20 DC ^Used this date as early online date, can replace once VoR available ET AAM: 12m embargo",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1002/gps.5259",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry",
issn = "0885-6230",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",

}

The value of dementia care towards the end of life- a contingent valuation study. / Bhattarai, Nawaraj; Mason, Helen; Kernohan, Ashleigh; Poole, Marie; Bamford, Claire; Robinson, Louise; Vale, Luke.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 24.01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The value of dementia care towards the end of life- a contingent valuation study

AU - Bhattarai, Nawaraj

AU - Mason, Helen

AU - Kernohan, Ashleigh

AU - Poole, Marie

AU - Bamford, Claire

AU - Robinson, Louise

AU - Vale, Luke

N1 - Acceptance from webpage/ in SAN AAM online 7/1/20, but VoR still to be published; have therefore treated as NYP. 15/1/20 DC ^Used this date as early online date, can replace once VoR available ET AAM: 12m embargo

PY - 2020/1/24

Y1 - 2020/1/24

N2 - Objectives: A Dementia Nurse Specialist (DNS) is expected to improve the quality of care and support to people with dementia nearing, and at, the end of life (EoL) by facilitating some key features of care. The aim of this study was to estimate willingness‐to‐pay (WTP) values from the general public perspective, for the different levels of support that the DNS can provide.Methods: Contingent valuation methods (CVM) were used to elicit the maximum WTP for scenarios describing different types of support provided by the DNS for end of life care in dementia. In a general population online survey, 1002 participants aged 18 years or more sampled from the United Kingdom provided valuations. Five scenarios were valued with mean WTP value calculated for each scenario along with the relationship between mean WTP and participant characteristics.Results: The mean WTP varied across scenarios with higher values for the scenarios offering more features. Participants with some experience of dementia were willing to pay more compared with those with no experience. WTP values were higher for high income groups compared with the lowest income level (p<0.05). There was no evidence to suggest that respondent characteristics such as age, gender, family size, health utility or education status influenced the WTP values.Conclusion: The general population values the anticipated improvement in dementia care provided by a DNS. This study will help inform judgements on interventions to improve the quality of end of life care.

AB - Objectives: A Dementia Nurse Specialist (DNS) is expected to improve the quality of care and support to people with dementia nearing, and at, the end of life (EoL) by facilitating some key features of care. The aim of this study was to estimate willingness‐to‐pay (WTP) values from the general public perspective, for the different levels of support that the DNS can provide.Methods: Contingent valuation methods (CVM) were used to elicit the maximum WTP for scenarios describing different types of support provided by the DNS for end of life care in dementia. In a general population online survey, 1002 participants aged 18 years or more sampled from the United Kingdom provided valuations. Five scenarios were valued with mean WTP value calculated for each scenario along with the relationship between mean WTP and participant characteristics.Results: The mean WTP varied across scenarios with higher values for the scenarios offering more features. Participants with some experience of dementia were willing to pay more compared with those with no experience. WTP values were higher for high income groups compared with the lowest income level (p<0.05). There was no evidence to suggest that respondent characteristics such as age, gender, family size, health utility or education status influenced the WTP values.Conclusion: The general population values the anticipated improvement in dementia care provided by a DNS. This study will help inform judgements on interventions to improve the quality of end of life care.

KW - contingent valuation

KW - willingness to pay

KW - dementia

KW - end of life care

KW - palliative care

U2 - 10.1002/gps.5259

DO - 10.1002/gps.5259

M3 - Article

JO - International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

JF - International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

SN - 0885-6230

ER -