The relationship between psychological distress and free-living physical activity in individuals with chronic low back pain

Cormac G. Ryan, Heather Gray, Mary Newton, Malcolm H. Granat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this cross-sectional pilot-study was to investigate the relationship between psychological distress and free-living physical activity (PA) in individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Thirty-eight participants with non-specific CLBP (29 = distressed; 9 = non-distressed) were recruited. PA levels were measured using an accelerometer (activPAL™ activity monitor) over a one week period. The following parameters of physical activity were recorded: time upright (standing or walking), time standing, time walking, and step count. Psychological distress was assessed using a modified version of the distress risk assessment method (DRAM) which is a combination of somatic anxiety and depressive symptoms. The Distressed group spent significantly less time upright over a mean 24 h day (-1.47 h, 95% CI -2.70 to -0.23 h, p <0.05), attributable to 1.01 h less standing and 0.46 h less walking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-189
Number of pages5
JournalManual Therapy
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2010

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Low Back Pain
Psychology
Walking
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression

Keywords

  • psychological distress
  • chronic low back pain
  • physical activity

Cite this

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abstract = "The aim of this cross-sectional pilot-study was to investigate the relationship between psychological distress and free-living physical activity (PA) in individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Thirty-eight participants with non-specific CLBP (29 = distressed; 9 = non-distressed) were recruited. PA levels were measured using an accelerometer (activPAL™ activity monitor) over a one week period. The following parameters of physical activity were recorded: time upright (standing or walking), time standing, time walking, and step count. Psychological distress was assessed using a modified version of the distress risk assessment method (DRAM) which is a combination of somatic anxiety and depressive symptoms. The Distressed group spent significantly less time upright over a mean 24 h day (-1.47 h, 95{\%} CI -2.70 to -0.23 h, p <0.05), attributable to 1.01 h less standing and 0.46 h less walking.",
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The relationship between psychological distress and free-living physical activity in individuals with chronic low back pain. / Ryan, Cormac G.; Gray, Heather; Newton, Mary; Granat, Malcolm H.

In: Manual Therapy, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.04.2010, p. 185-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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