The effect of environment and task on gait parameters after stroke: a randomized comparison of measurement conditions

Susan E. Lord, Lynn Rochester, Mark Weatherall, Kathryn M. McPherson, Harry K. McNaughton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of environment and a secondary task on gait parameters in community ambulant stroke survivors and to assess the contribution of clinical symptoms to gait performance. Twenty-seven people with stroke (mean age, 61±11.6y; mean time since stroke onset, 45.8±34.2mo), living at home, were recruited from community stroke groups and from a local rehabilitation unit. Selection criteria included the following: ability to give informed consent, unilateral first ever or recurrent stroke at least 6 months previously, walking independently in the community, a gait speed between 24 and 50m/min, Mini-Mental State Examination score of 24 or higher, and no severe comorbidity. Twenty-seven people with a mean baseline gait speed of 42.2±5.9m/min were randomly allocated to 1 of 9 conditions in which the setting and distraction were manipulated. Analysis of variance showed a significant main effect for environment (P=.046) but not for task (P=.37). The interaction between task and environment was not significant (P=.73). Adjusting for baseline gait speed, people walked on average 8.8m/min faster in the clinic (95% confidence interval, 0.3-17.3m/min) than in the mall. Scores for fatigue, anxiety and depression, and attentional deficit were higher than normative values but did not influence gait performance.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2006

Keywords

  • stroke
  • gait
  • rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of environment and task on gait parameters after stroke: a randomized comparison of measurement conditions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this