The design, development and evaluation of a personalised music-listening intervention for people with dementia in acute care

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    Music presents a powerful emotional, social and cognitive stimulus for people with dementia (PWD) (Särkämö, Laitinen,Tervaniemi, Numminen, Kurki & Rantanen, 2012). Not only does it bypass the economical deficit and ethical risks inherent within traditional, pharmacological and physical treatment methods, it further works to reduce the incidence of the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, thus proffering a whole host of beneficial outcomes for both the individual and wider society (Lin, Chu, Yang, Chen, Chen,Chang et al., 2011). In particular, the use of personally meaningful music preferences (PM) appears be a particularly fruitful yet relatively untapped area of research. Irrespective of the severity of cognitive decline, individuals with dementia often remain responsive to familiar musical preferences where other stimuli have failed (Baird & Samson, 2009).
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages624-625
    Number of pages2
    Publication statusPublished - 17 Aug 2015

    Fingerprint

    Music
    Dementia
    Behavioral Symptoms
    Pharmacology
    Psychology
    Incidence
    Research

    Keywords

    • personalised music
    • music therapy
    • dementia
    • cognitive stimulus

    Cite this

    @conference{01587bffb33b4554a7027e9fe0b20d6b,
    title = "The design, development and evaluation of a personalised music-listening intervention for people with dementia in acute care",
    abstract = "Music presents a powerful emotional, social and cognitive stimulus for people with dementia (PWD) (S{\"a}rk{\"a}m{\"o}, Laitinen,Tervaniemi, Numminen, Kurki & Rantanen, 2012). Not only does it bypass the economical deficit and ethical risks inherent within traditional, pharmacological and physical treatment methods, it further works to reduce the incidence of the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, thus proffering a whole host of beneficial outcomes for both the individual and wider society (Lin, Chu, Yang, Chen, Chen,Chang et al., 2011). In particular, the use of personally meaningful music preferences (PM) appears be a particularly fruitful yet relatively untapped area of research. Irrespective of the severity of cognitive decline, individuals with dementia often remain responsive to familiar musical preferences where other stimuli have failed (Baird & Samson, 2009).",
    keywords = "personalised music, music therapy, dementia, cognitive stimulus",
    author = "Paisley, {Anna M. J. M.} and Gianna Cassidy and Don Knox",
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    language = "English",
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    AU - Paisley, Anna M. J. M.

    AU - Cassidy, Gianna

    AU - Knox, Don

    PY - 2015/8/17

    Y1 - 2015/8/17

    N2 - Music presents a powerful emotional, social and cognitive stimulus for people with dementia (PWD) (Särkämö, Laitinen,Tervaniemi, Numminen, Kurki & Rantanen, 2012). Not only does it bypass the economical deficit and ethical risks inherent within traditional, pharmacological and physical treatment methods, it further works to reduce the incidence of the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, thus proffering a whole host of beneficial outcomes for both the individual and wider society (Lin, Chu, Yang, Chen, Chen,Chang et al., 2011). In particular, the use of personally meaningful music preferences (PM) appears be a particularly fruitful yet relatively untapped area of research. Irrespective of the severity of cognitive decline, individuals with dementia often remain responsive to familiar musical preferences where other stimuli have failed (Baird & Samson, 2009).

    AB - Music presents a powerful emotional, social and cognitive stimulus for people with dementia (PWD) (Särkämö, Laitinen,Tervaniemi, Numminen, Kurki & Rantanen, 2012). Not only does it bypass the economical deficit and ethical risks inherent within traditional, pharmacological and physical treatment methods, it further works to reduce the incidence of the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, thus proffering a whole host of beneficial outcomes for both the individual and wider society (Lin, Chu, Yang, Chen, Chen,Chang et al., 2011). In particular, the use of personally meaningful music preferences (PM) appears be a particularly fruitful yet relatively untapped area of research. Irrespective of the severity of cognitive decline, individuals with dementia often remain responsive to familiar musical preferences where other stimuli have failed (Baird & Samson, 2009).

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    KW - music therapy

    KW - dementia

    KW - cognitive stimulus

    M3 - Paper

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    EP - 625

    ER -