The accessibility and acceptability of self-management support interventions for men with long term conditions: a systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies

Paul A. Galdas, Zoe Darwin, Lisa Kidd, Christian Blickem, Kerri McPherson, Kate Hunt, Peter Bower, Simon Gilbody, Gerry Richardson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Self-management support interventions can improve health outcomes, but their impact is limited by the numbers of people able or willing to access them. Men’s attendance at existing self-management support services appears suboptimal despite their increased risk of developing many of the most serious long term conditions. The aim of this review was to determine whether current self-management support interventions are acceptable and accessible to men with long term conditions, and explore what may act as facilitators and barriers to access of interventions and support activities.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume14
Issue number1230
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Self Care
Health

Keywords

  • self management
  • men
  • long-term conditions
  • interventions

Cite this

Galdas, Paul A. ; Darwin, Zoe ; Kidd, Lisa ; Blickem, Christian ; McPherson, Kerri ; Hunt, Kate ; Bower, Peter ; Gilbody, Simon ; Richardson, Gerry. / The accessibility and acceptability of self-management support interventions for men with long term conditions: a systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies. In: BMC Public Health. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 1230.
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The accessibility and acceptability of self-management support interventions for men with long term conditions: a systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies. / Galdas, Paul A.; Darwin, Zoe; Kidd, Lisa; Blickem, Christian; McPherson, Kerri; Hunt, Kate; Bower, Peter; Gilbody, Simon; Richardson, Gerry.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 14, No. 1230, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Darwin, Zoe

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AU - Gilbody, Simon

AU - Richardson, Gerry

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