‘Stop kissing and steaming!’: tuberculosis and the occupational health movement in Massachusetts and Lancashire, 1870–1918

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Historians have argued that American social welfare reformers looked to Europe for examples of successful programmes. This article provides a countercase where a progressive American state, Massachusetts, developed public health reforms prior to their British counterparts. Social concerns about reducing cases of tuberculosis in Massachusetts’ cotton manufacturing cities led to the transference of the public health discourse fromthe urban living environment to the workplace. This same relationship could have been applied within the Lancashire industry. Instead, the urban public health discourse focused on living conditions. In both countries, local and state political structures influenced health campaigners‘ actions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalUrban History
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2005

Keywords

  • public health reforms
  • tuberculosis
  • social welfare

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '‘Stop kissing and steaming!’: tuberculosis and the occupational health movement in Massachusetts and Lancashire, 1870–1918'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this