Social work and countering violent extremism in Sweden and the UK

Jo Finch, Jessica H. Jonsson, Masoud Kamali, David McKendrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Social Work in many Western democracies, is now being increasingly tasked with managing the “problems” of terrorism, namely supporting those affected by terrorist attacks, managing returnees affiliated with Terrorist groups in the Middle East, or, as will be discussed here, identifying those at risk from radicalisation and extremism. Both Britain and Sweden have long standing Counter-Terrorism policies, but decent results developments in both countries, have made it a statutory requirement for social workers, to work within particular policies, PREVENT in the UK, and CVE in Sweden, to identify and manage the risk of those deemed to have, or are at risk of ddeveloping veloping radical and extremist views. These new developments, have been with little in the way of critical debate from social workers and social work academics, and, in some cases we are witnessing a passive adjustment of social work practices and research to the policies of securitisation rather than concern for the matters of social cohesion and social justice. This paper seeks to explores the policies in both countries utilising a comparative approach, to consider the similarities in not only policy and practice, but also in the ethical consequences such policies pose for social workers across Europe. This paper has implications therefore, beyond the British and Swedish context in terms of the increasing neo-liberalisation of social work across Europe.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Work
Volume22
Issue number6
Early online date11 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Sep 2019

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radicalism
Sweden
social work
social worker
terrorism
radicalization
social cohesion
Middle East
social justice
liberalization
democracy
Group

Cite this

Finch, Jo ; Jonsson, Jessica H. ; Kamali, Masoud ; McKendrick, David. / Social work and countering violent extremism in Sweden and the UK. In: European Journal of Social Work. 2019 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 1-12.
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Social work and countering violent extremism in Sweden and the UK. / Finch, Jo; Jonsson, Jessica H. ; Kamali, Masoud; McKendrick, David.

In: European Journal of Social Work, Vol. 22, No. 6, 11.09.2019, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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