Smoking after coronary artery bypass: high three-year mortality

Grace M. Lindsay, Elizabeth P. Tolmie, W.M. Martin, I. M. Hutton, Philip R. Belcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is carried out for prognosis and symptomatic relief. Smoking is associated with increased postoperative complications, although its precise influence on long-term survival is unclear. We examined the influence of smoking and other risk factors on survival and myocardial ischaemia seven years after CABG. 208 patients underwent elective CABG; 25 % were persistent smokers. 165 were alive at seven years. 128 (78 % of survivors) agreed to reexamination and 79 had thallium scans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-140
Number of pages6
JournalThoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon
Volume57
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2009

Keywords

  • cardiology
  • coronary artery bypass grafting
  • smoking
  • heart surgery

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