Sedentary behaviour and health in adults: an overview of systematic reviews

Travis J. Saunders, Travis McIsaac, Kevin Douillette, Nick Gaulton, Stephen Hunter, Ryan E. Rhodes, Stephanie A. Prince, Valerie Carson, Jean Philippe Chaput, Sebastien Chastin, Lora Giangregorio, Ian Janssen, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Michelle E. Kho, Veronica J. Poitras, Kenneth E. Powell, Robert Ross, Amanda Ross-White, Mark S. Tremblay, Genevieve N. Healy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

179 Citations (Scopus)
71 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The purpose of this overview of systematic reviews was to determine the relationship between different types and patterns of sedentary behaviour and selected health outcomes in adults and older adults. Five electronic databases were last searched in May, 2019, with a 10-year search limit. Included reviews met the a priori population (community-dwelling adults aged 18 years and older), intervention/exposure/comparator (various types and/or patterns of sedentary behaviour), and outcomes criteria. Eighteen systematic reviews were included in the evidence synthesis. High levels of sedentary behaviour are unfavourably associated with cognitive function, depression, function and disability, physical activity levels, and physical health-related quality of life in adults. Reducing or breaking up sedentary behaviour may benefit body composition and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Total sedentary behaviour and TV viewing were most consistently associated with unfavourable health outcomes, while computer and Internet use may be favourably associated with cognitive function for older adults. The quality of evidence within individual reviews (as assessed by review authors) varied from low to high, while the certainty of evidence was low to very low. These findings have important public health implications, suggesting that adults should avoid high levels of sedentary behaviour and break-up periods of prolonged sitting. (PROSPERO registration nos.: CRD42019123121 and CRD42019127157.) Novelty High levels of sedentary behaviour are unfavourably associated with important health outcomes in adults. Reducing or breaking up sedentary behaviour may benefit body composition and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Computer and Internet use may be favourably associated with cognitive function in older adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S197-S217
JournalApplied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme
Volume45
Issue number10 (Suppl. 2)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2020

Keywords

  • adultes
  • adults
  • assis
  • comportement sédentaire
  • directives
  • guidelines
  • public health
  • santé publique
  • screen time
  • sedentary behaviour
  • sitting
  • temps d’écran

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Physiology (medical)

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