Risk of transmission associated with sharing drug injecting paraphernalia: analysis of recent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection using cross-sectional survey data

Norah Palmateer, S. Hutchinson, G. McAllister, A. Munro, S. Cameron, D. Goldberg, A. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Sharing injecting paraphernalia (containers, filters and water) poses a risk of transmitting the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The prevalence of, and risk of HCV from, such behaviour has not been extensively reported in Europe. People who inject drugs (PWID) were recruited in cross-sectional surveys from services providing sterile injecting equipment across Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Participants completed a questionnaire and provided a blood spot for anonymous testing. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between recent HCV infection (anti-HCV negative and HCV-RNA positive) and self-reported measures of injecting equipment sharing in the 6 months preceding interview.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-32
JournalJournal of Viral Hepatitis
Volume21
Issue number1
Early online date28 May 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

Virus Diseases
Hepacivirus
Cross-Sectional Studies
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Anonymous Testing
Equipment and Supplies
Scotland
Logistic Models
RNA
Interviews
Water

Keywords

  • virus transmission
  • hepatitis C
  • intravenous drug use

Cite this

@article{73ee992e756c4d989d284e062a43a293,
title = "Risk of transmission associated with sharing drug injecting paraphernalia: analysis of recent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection using cross-sectional survey data",
abstract = "Sharing injecting paraphernalia (containers, filters and water) poses a risk of transmitting the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The prevalence of, and risk of HCV from, such behaviour has not been extensively reported in Europe. People who inject drugs (PWID) were recruited in cross-sectional surveys from services providing sterile injecting equipment across Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Participants completed a questionnaire and provided a blood spot for anonymous testing. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between recent HCV infection (anti-HCV negative and HCV-RNA positive) and self-reported measures of injecting equipment sharing in the 6 months preceding interview.",
keywords = "virus transmission, hepatitis C, intravenous drug use",
author = "Norah Palmateer and S. Hutchinson and G. McAllister and A. Munro and S. Cameron and D. Goldberg and A. Taylor",
note = "Page no's etc not yet available ET 18-11-13 Updated details 1-6-16",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jvh.12117",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "25--32",
journal = "Journal of Viral Hepatitis",
issn = "1352-0504",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk of transmission associated with sharing drug injecting paraphernalia: analysis of recent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection using cross-sectional survey data

AU - Palmateer, Norah

AU - Hutchinson, S.

AU - McAllister, G.

AU - Munro, A.

AU - Cameron, S.

AU - Goldberg, D.

AU - Taylor, A.

N1 - Page no's etc not yet available ET 18-11-13 Updated details 1-6-16

PY - 2014/1

Y1 - 2014/1

N2 - Sharing injecting paraphernalia (containers, filters and water) poses a risk of transmitting the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The prevalence of, and risk of HCV from, such behaviour has not been extensively reported in Europe. People who inject drugs (PWID) were recruited in cross-sectional surveys from services providing sterile injecting equipment across Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Participants completed a questionnaire and provided a blood spot for anonymous testing. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between recent HCV infection (anti-HCV negative and HCV-RNA positive) and self-reported measures of injecting equipment sharing in the 6 months preceding interview.

AB - Sharing injecting paraphernalia (containers, filters and water) poses a risk of transmitting the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The prevalence of, and risk of HCV from, such behaviour has not been extensively reported in Europe. People who inject drugs (PWID) were recruited in cross-sectional surveys from services providing sterile injecting equipment across Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Participants completed a questionnaire and provided a blood spot for anonymous testing. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between recent HCV infection (anti-HCV negative and HCV-RNA positive) and self-reported measures of injecting equipment sharing in the 6 months preceding interview.

KW - virus transmission

KW - hepatitis C

KW - intravenous drug use

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84878218446&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jvh.12117

DO - 10.1111/jvh.12117

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84878218446

VL - 21

SP - 25

EP - 32

JO - Journal of Viral Hepatitis

JF - Journal of Viral Hepatitis

SN - 1352-0504

IS - 1

ER -