Rethinking work and income maintenance policy: promoting gender equality through a citizens basic income

Ailsa McKay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A citizens' basic income scheme is based on the principles of individuality, universality, and unconditionality; when combined with the notion of meeting "basic needs" it would serve to provide a minimum income guarantee for all adult members of society. However, implementation would entail radical reform of existing patterns of welfare delivery and would bring into question the institutionalized relationship between work and welfare, a basic premise of modern welfare states. To date, the debate over a citizens' basic income has emphasized its effects on labor markets, thereby displaying an androcentric bias. Although the role of women in society is central to social policy reform, the existing basic income literature is disturbingly void of any comprehensive treatment of women. No genuine discussion has taken place about the nature of women's lives and work and how these should be valued. Social policy reform should take account of all gender inequalities and not just those relating to the traditional labor market. This paper argues that the citizens' basic income model can be a tool for promoting gender-neutral social citizenship rights, but that any future marriage of justice and efficiency must first divorce work from income.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFeminist Economics
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2001

Fingerprint

basic income
gender policy
equality
citizen
income
reform
labor market
welfare
minimum income
basic need
individuality
gender
divorce
welfare state
guarantee
citizenship
marriage
justice
efficiency
Gender equality

Keywords

  • gender
  • citizenship
  • citizens' basic income
  • social security

Cite this

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Rethinking work and income maintenance policy: promoting gender equality through a citizens basic income. / McKay, Ailsa.

In: Feminist Economics, 01.03.2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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