Reliability and validity of three questionnaires measuring context-specific sedentary behaviour and associated correlates in adolescents, adults and older adults

Cedric Busschaert, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Veerle Van Holle, Sebastien FM Chastin, Greet Cardon, Katrien De Cocker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Reliable and valid measures of total sedentary time, context-specific sedentary behaviour (SB) and its potential correlates are useful for the development of future interventions. The purpose was to examine test-retest
reliability and criterion validity of three newly developed questionnaires on total sedentary time, context-specific SB and its potential correlates in adolescents, adults and older adults.
Methods: Reliability and validity was tested in six different samples of Flemish (Belgium) residents. For the reliability study, 20 adolescents, 22 adults and 20 older adults filled out the age-specific SB questionnaire twice. Test-retest
reliability was analysed using Kappa coefficients, Intraclass Correlation Coefficients and/or percentage agreement, separately for the three age groups. For the validity study, data were retrieved from 62 adolescents, 33 adults and 33 older adults, with activPAL™ as criterion measure. Spearman correlations and Bland-Altman plots (or nonparametric approach) were used to analyse criterion validity, separately for the three age groups and for weekday, weekend day and average day.
Results: The test-retest reliability for self-reported total sedentary time indicated following values: ICC = 0.37-0.67 in adolescents; ICC = 0.73-0.77 in adults; ICC = 0.68-0.80 in older adults. Item-specific reliability results (e.g. context-specific SB and its potential correlates) showed good-to-excellent reliability in 67.94 %, 68.90 % and 66.38 % of the items in adolescents, adults and older adults respectively. All items belonging to sedentary-related equipment and simultaneous SB showed good reliability. The sections of the questionnaire with lowest reliability were: context-specific SB (adolescents), potential correlates of computer use (adults) and potential correlates of motorized transport (older adults). Spearman correlations between self-reported total sedentary time and the activPAL™ were different for each age group: ¿ = 0.02-0.42 (adolescents), ¿ = 0.06-0.52 (adults), ¿ = 0.38-0.50 (older adults). Participants over-reported total sedentary time (except for weekend day in older adults) compared to the activPAL™, for weekday, weekend day and
average day respectively by +57.05 %, +46.29 %, +53.34 % in adolescents; +40.40 %, +19.15 %, +32.89 % in adults; +10.10 %, -6.24 %, +4.11 % in older adults.
Conclusions: The questionnaires showed acceptable test-retest reliability and criterion validity. However, over-reporting of total SB was noticeable in adolescents and adults. Nevertheless, these questionnaires will be useful in getting context-specific information on SB.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume12
Issue number117
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Sep 2015

Keywords

  • sedentary behaviour
  • adolescents
  • adults
  • older adults
  • questionnaire
  • validity
  • reliability

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Reliability and validity of three questionnaires measuring context-specific sedentary behaviour and associated correlates in adolescents, adults and older adults'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this