Relationships between socioeconomic position and objectively measured sedentary behaviour in older adults in three prospective cohorts

Richard John Shaw, Iva Cukic, Ian J. Deary, Catharine R. Gale, Sebastien F.M. Chastin, Philippa M. Dall, Dawn A. Skelton, Geoff Der

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives: To Investigate whether sedentary behaviour in older adults is associated with a systematic and comprehensive range of socioeconomic position (SEP) measures across the lifecourse. SEP measures included prospective measures of social class, income, educational qualifications and parental social class and contemporaneous measures of area deprivation.
Setting: Glasgow and the surrounding (West of Scotland) combined with Edinburgh and the surrounding area (the Lothians).
Participants: Community dwelling adults aged around 79, 83, and 64 years from, respectively, the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936) (n=271) and the 1930s (n=119) and 1950s (n=310) cohorts of the West of Scotland Twenty-07 study
Primary outcome measure: Sedentary behaviour was measured objectively using an activPAL activity monitor worn continuously for seven days, and used to calculate percentage of waking time spent sedentary.
Results: Among retired participants, for most cohort and SEP combinations, greater social disadvantage was associated with increased sedentary time. For example, in the Twenty-07 1930s cohort those most deprived on the Carstairs measure spent 6.5% (95% CI 0.3 to 12.7) more of their waking time sedentary than the least deprived. However, for employed people the relationship between SEP and sedentary behaviour was much weaker For example, in terms of social class differences, among the retired the most disadvantaged spent 5.7% more waking time sedentary (95% CI 2.6% to 87%) whereas among the employed there was effectively no difference (-0.5%; 95% CI -9.0 to 8.0.
Conclusions: Diverse SEP measures were associated with increased sedentary behaviour among retired people. There was little evidence for a relationship between SEP measures and sedentary behaviour among employed older adults. Prior to retirement the constraints of the workplace may be masking effects which are only apparent at weekends.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere016436
JournalBMJ Open
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2017

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Social Class
Scotland
Independent Living
Retirement
Vulnerable Populations
Workplace
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parturition

Keywords

  • socioeconomic status
  • sedentary behaviour
  • older adults

Cite this

@article{6ac47dda707e47679e7b3b769e89f6c7,
title = "Relationships between socioeconomic position and objectively measured sedentary behaviour in older adults in three prospective cohorts",
abstract = "Objectives: To Investigate whether sedentary behaviour in older adults is associated with a systematic and comprehensive range of socioeconomic position (SEP) measures across the lifecourse. SEP measures included prospective measures of social class, income, educational qualifications and parental social class and contemporaneous measures of area deprivation.Setting: Glasgow and the surrounding (West of Scotland) combined with Edinburgh and the surrounding area (the Lothians). Participants: Community dwelling adults aged around 79, 83, and 64 years from, respectively, the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936) (n=271) and the 1930s (n=119) and 1950s (n=310) cohorts of the West of Scotland Twenty-07 studyPrimary outcome measure: Sedentary behaviour was measured objectively using an activPAL activity monitor worn continuously for seven days, and used to calculate percentage of waking time spent sedentary.Results: Among retired participants, for most cohort and SEP combinations, greater social disadvantage was associated with increased sedentary time. For example, in the Twenty-07 1930s cohort those most deprived on the Carstairs measure spent 6.5{\%} (95{\%} CI 0.3 to 12.7) more of their waking time sedentary than the least deprived. However, for employed people the relationship between SEP and sedentary behaviour was much weaker For example, in terms of social class differences, among the retired the most disadvantaged spent 5.7{\%} more waking time sedentary (95{\%} CI 2.6{\%} to 87{\%}) whereas among the employed there was effectively no difference (-0.5{\%}; 95{\%} CI -9.0 to 8.0.Conclusions: Diverse SEP measures were associated with increased sedentary behaviour among retired people. There was little evidence for a relationship between SEP measures and sedentary behaviour among employed older adults. Prior to retirement the constraints of the workplace may be masking effects which are only apparent at weekends.",
keywords = "socioeconomic status, sedentary behaviour, older adults",
author = "Shaw, {Richard John} and Iva Cukic and Deary, {Ian J.} and Gale, {Catharine R.} and Chastin, {Sebastien F.M.} and Dall, {Philippa M.} and Skelton, {Dawn A.} and Geoff Der",
note = "Acceptance email in SAN Linked to MRC project, another institution is funding APC. Funding note: Funding The Seniors USP (understanding sedentary patterns) project is funded by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) as part of the Lifelong Health and Wellbeing Initiative (LLHW) [MR/K025023/1]. The West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study was funded by the MRC and the data were originally collected by the MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit (MC_A540_53462). LBC1936 data collection are supported by the Disconnected Mind project (funded by Age UK and MRC [Mr/M01311/1 and G1001245/96077]) and undertaken within the University of Edinburgh Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology (funded by the BBSRC and MRC as part of the LLHW [MR/K026992/1]). Compliant with funder policy.",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016436",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
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Relationships between socioeconomic position and objectively measured sedentary behaviour in older adults in three prospective cohorts. / Shaw, Richard John; Cukic, Iva; Deary, Ian J.; Gale, Catharine R.; Chastin, Sebastien F.M.; Dall, Philippa M.; Skelton, Dawn A.; Der, Geoff.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 7, No. 6, e016436, 15.06.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationships between socioeconomic position and objectively measured sedentary behaviour in older adults in three prospective cohorts

AU - Shaw, Richard John

AU - Cukic, Iva

AU - Deary, Ian J.

AU - Gale, Catharine R.

AU - Chastin, Sebastien F.M.

AU - Dall, Philippa M.

AU - Skelton, Dawn A.

AU - Der, Geoff

N1 - Acceptance email in SAN Linked to MRC project, another institution is funding APC. Funding note: Funding The Seniors USP (understanding sedentary patterns) project is funded by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) as part of the Lifelong Health and Wellbeing Initiative (LLHW) [MR/K025023/1]. The West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study was funded by the MRC and the data were originally collected by the MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit (MC_A540_53462). LBC1936 data collection are supported by the Disconnected Mind project (funded by Age UK and MRC [Mr/M01311/1 and G1001245/96077]) and undertaken within the University of Edinburgh Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology (funded by the BBSRC and MRC as part of the LLHW [MR/K026992/1]). Compliant with funder policy.

PY - 2017/6/15

Y1 - 2017/6/15

N2 - Objectives: To Investigate whether sedentary behaviour in older adults is associated with a systematic and comprehensive range of socioeconomic position (SEP) measures across the lifecourse. SEP measures included prospective measures of social class, income, educational qualifications and parental social class and contemporaneous measures of area deprivation.Setting: Glasgow and the surrounding (West of Scotland) combined with Edinburgh and the surrounding area (the Lothians). Participants: Community dwelling adults aged around 79, 83, and 64 years from, respectively, the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936) (n=271) and the 1930s (n=119) and 1950s (n=310) cohorts of the West of Scotland Twenty-07 studyPrimary outcome measure: Sedentary behaviour was measured objectively using an activPAL activity monitor worn continuously for seven days, and used to calculate percentage of waking time spent sedentary.Results: Among retired participants, for most cohort and SEP combinations, greater social disadvantage was associated with increased sedentary time. For example, in the Twenty-07 1930s cohort those most deprived on the Carstairs measure spent 6.5% (95% CI 0.3 to 12.7) more of their waking time sedentary than the least deprived. However, for employed people the relationship between SEP and sedentary behaviour was much weaker For example, in terms of social class differences, among the retired the most disadvantaged spent 5.7% more waking time sedentary (95% CI 2.6% to 87%) whereas among the employed there was effectively no difference (-0.5%; 95% CI -9.0 to 8.0.Conclusions: Diverse SEP measures were associated with increased sedentary behaviour among retired people. There was little evidence for a relationship between SEP measures and sedentary behaviour among employed older adults. Prior to retirement the constraints of the workplace may be masking effects which are only apparent at weekends.

AB - Objectives: To Investigate whether sedentary behaviour in older adults is associated with a systematic and comprehensive range of socioeconomic position (SEP) measures across the lifecourse. SEP measures included prospective measures of social class, income, educational qualifications and parental social class and contemporaneous measures of area deprivation.Setting: Glasgow and the surrounding (West of Scotland) combined with Edinburgh and the surrounding area (the Lothians). Participants: Community dwelling adults aged around 79, 83, and 64 years from, respectively, the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936) (n=271) and the 1930s (n=119) and 1950s (n=310) cohorts of the West of Scotland Twenty-07 studyPrimary outcome measure: Sedentary behaviour was measured objectively using an activPAL activity monitor worn continuously for seven days, and used to calculate percentage of waking time spent sedentary.Results: Among retired participants, for most cohort and SEP combinations, greater social disadvantage was associated with increased sedentary time. For example, in the Twenty-07 1930s cohort those most deprived on the Carstairs measure spent 6.5% (95% CI 0.3 to 12.7) more of their waking time sedentary than the least deprived. However, for employed people the relationship between SEP and sedentary behaviour was much weaker For example, in terms of social class differences, among the retired the most disadvantaged spent 5.7% more waking time sedentary (95% CI 2.6% to 87%) whereas among the employed there was effectively no difference (-0.5%; 95% CI -9.0 to 8.0.Conclusions: Diverse SEP measures were associated with increased sedentary behaviour among retired people. There was little evidence for a relationship between SEP measures and sedentary behaviour among employed older adults. Prior to retirement the constraints of the workplace may be masking effects which are only apparent at weekends.

KW - socioeconomic status

KW - sedentary behaviour

KW - older adults

U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016436

DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016436

M3 - Article

VL - 7

JO - BMJ Open

JF - BMJ Open

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 6

M1 - e016436

ER -