Randomised controlled trial of electrical stimulation of the quadriceps after proximal femoral fracture

Virginia Braid, Mark Barber, Sarah L. Mitchell, Brendan J. Martin, Malcolm H. Granat, David J. Stott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Proximal femoral fracture is often associated with long-term residual disability. Quadriceps weakness may be a factor in poor outcome. This study aimed to determine whether training of the quadriceps using electrical stimulation (ES) increases leg extensor power and decreases disability in elderly subjects rehabilitating after fracture. Methods: A single-blind randomized controlled trial of elderly post-surgical proximal femoral fracture patients, comparing 6 weeks of supplementary electrical stimulation of the quadriceps (15 patients) to usual physiotherapy alone (11 patients). The electrical stimulation on:off duty cycle was 7:23 seconds, with 36 cycles per session, given daily as an in-patient and twice weekly after discharge. The primary outcome measure was change in leg extensor power (Nottingham Power Rig). Functional mobility (Elderly Mobility Scale), disability (Barthel Index) and health status (Nottingham Health Profile) were also measured.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-68
Number of pages7
JournalAging Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume20
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2008

Keywords

  • randomised controlled trial
  • proximal femoral fracture
  • quadriceps weakness

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