Quantifying upper limb tremor in people with multiple sclerosis using Fast Fourier Transform based analysis of wrist accelerometer signals

Stefan Teufl, Jenny Preston, Frederike van Wijck, Ben Stansfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction
Tremor is a disabling symptom of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The development of objective methods of tremor characterisation to assess intervention efficacy and disease progression is therefore important. The possibility of using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method for tremor detection was explored.

Methods
Acceleration from a wrist-worn device was analysed using FFTs to identify and characterise tremor magnitude and frequency. Processing parameters were explored to provide insight into the optimal algorithm. Participants wore a wrist tri-axial accelerometer during 9 tasks. The FAHN clinical assessment of tremor was used as the reference standard.

Results
Five people with MS and tremor (57.6 ± 15.3 years, 3 F/2M) and ten disease-free controls (42.4 ± 10.9 years, 5 M/5F) took part. Using specific algorithm settings tremor identification was possible (peak frequency 3–15Hz; magnitude greater than 0.06 g; 2 s windows with 50% overlap; using 2 of 3 axes of acceleration), giving sensitivity 0.974 and specificity 0.971 (38 tremor occurrences out of 108 tasks, 1 false positive, 2 false negatives). Tremor had frequency 3.5–13.0 Hz and amplitude 0.07–2.60g.

Conclusions
Upper limb tremor in people with MS can be detected using a FFT approach based on acceleration recorded at the wrist, demonstrating the possibility of using this minimally encumbering technique within clinical practice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies Engineering
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • multiple sclerosis, tremor, wrist accelerometer sensor, Fast Fourier Transform analysis, algorithm development

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Quantifying upper limb tremor in people with multiple sclerosis using Fast Fourier Transform based analysis of wrist accelerometer signals'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this