Psychomotor learning theory informing the design and evaluation of an interactive augmented reality hand hygiene training app for healthcare workers

Gerard Lacey*, Lucyna Gozdzielewska, Kareena McAloney-Kocaman, Jonathan Ruttle, Sean Cronin, Lesley Price

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Hand hygiene is critical for infection control, but studies report poor transfer from training to practice. Hand hygiene training in hospitals typically involves one classroom session per year, but psychomotor skills require repetition and feedback for retention. We describe the design and independent evaluation of a mobile interactive augmented reality training tool for the World Health Organisation (WHO) hand hygiene technique. The design was based on a detailed analysis of the underlying educational theory relating to psychomotor skills learning. During the evaluation forty-seven subjects used AR hand hygiene training over 4 weeks. Hand hygiene proficiency was assessed at weekly intervals, both electronically and via human inspection. Thirty eight participants (81%) reached proficiency after 24.3 (SD = 17.8) two-minute practice sessions. The study demonstrated that interactive mobile applications could empower learners to develop hand hygiene skills independently. Healthcare organizations could improve hand hygiene quality by using self-directed skills-based training combined with regular ward-based assessments.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3813-3832
Number of pages20
JournalEducation and Information Technologies
Volume27
Issue number3
Early online date11 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2022

Keywords

  • mobile augmented reality
  • mobile learning
  • psychomotor learning
  • deliberate practice
  • test enhanced learning
  • hand hygiene training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)
  • Education
  • Library and Information Sciences

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