Preparedness for use of the rapid result HIV self-test by gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM): a mixed methods exploratory study among MSM and those involved in HIV prevention and care

P. Flowers, J. Riddell, C. Park, B. Ahmed, I. Young, J. Frankis, M. Davis, M. Gilbert, C. Estcourt, L. Wallace, L.M. McDaid

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Abstract

ObjectivesThe aim of the study was to explore preparedness for the HIV self-test among men who have sexwith men (MSM) and those involved in HIV prevention and care.MethodsA mixed methods exploratory research design was employed, detailing awareness and willingnessto use the self-test and the perceived barriers and facilitators to implementation. Quantitative andqualitative data collection and analysis were completed in parallel. Descriptive and inferentialanalysis of cross-sectional bar-based survey data collected from MSM through a self-completed questionnaire and oral fluid specimen collection (n = 999) was combined with qualitative,thematic, analysis of data collected through 12 expert focus groups (n = 55) consisting of gaymen, National Health Service (NHS) staff, community organizations, entrepreneurs and activists.Findings were subsequently combined and assessed for synergies.ResultsAmong MSM, self-test awareness was moderate (55%). Greater awareness was associated with increasededucational attainment [adjusted odds ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00–2.30; P = 0.05] andprevious history of sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing (adjusted odds ratio 1.63; 95% CI 1.11–2.39; P = 0.01). Willingness to use the test was high (89%) and associated with meeting sexual partnersonline (unadjusted odds ratio 1.96; 95% CI 1.31–2.94; P < 0.001). Experts highlighted the overallacceptability of self-testing; it was understood as convenient, discreet, accessible, and with a low burdento services. However, some ambivalence towards self-testing was reported; it could reduce opportunitiesto engage with wider services, wider health issues and the determinants of risk.ConclusionsSelf-testing represents an opportunity to reduce barriers to HIV testing and enhance preventionand access to care. Levels of awareness are moderate but willingness to use is high. Self-testingmay amplify health inequalities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)245–255
Number of pages11
JournalHIV Medicine
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Apr 2017

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Odds Ratio
HIV
Confidence Intervals
Specimen Handling
National Health Programs
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Focus Groups
Health Services
Research Design
Organizations
Health
Sexual Minorities
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • HIV prevention
  • gay men
  • MSM
  • rapid result HIV self-test

Cite this

@article{f1aae2747a2a48f792377d3b87ff39f0,
title = "Preparedness for use of the rapid result HIV self-test by gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM): a mixed methods exploratory study among MSM and those involved in HIV prevention and care",
abstract = "ObjectivesThe aim of the study was to explore preparedness for the HIV self-test among men who have sexwith men (MSM) and those involved in HIV prevention and care.MethodsA mixed methods exploratory research design was employed, detailing awareness and willingnessto use the self-test and the perceived barriers and facilitators to implementation. Quantitative andqualitative data collection and analysis were completed in parallel. Descriptive and inferentialanalysis of cross-sectional bar-based survey data collected from MSM through a self-completed questionnaire and oral fluid specimen collection (n = 999) was combined with qualitative,thematic, analysis of data collected through 12 expert focus groups (n = 55) consisting of gaymen, National Health Service (NHS) staff, community organizations, entrepreneurs and activists.Findings were subsequently combined and assessed for synergies.ResultsAmong MSM, self-test awareness was moderate (55{\%}). Greater awareness was associated with increasededucational attainment [adjusted odds ratio 1.51; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.00–2.30; P = 0.05] andprevious history of sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing (adjusted odds ratio 1.63; 95{\%} CI 1.11–2.39; P = 0.01). Willingness to use the test was high (89{\%}) and associated with meeting sexual partnersonline (unadjusted odds ratio 1.96; 95{\%} CI 1.31–2.94; P < 0.001). Experts highlighted the overallacceptability of self-testing; it was understood as convenient, discreet, accessible, and with a low burdento services. However, some ambivalence towards self-testing was reported; it could reduce opportunitiesto engage with wider services, wider health issues and the determinants of risk.ConclusionsSelf-testing represents an opportunity to reduce barriers to HIV testing and enhance preventionand access to care. Levels of awareness are moderate but willingness to use is high. Self-testingmay amplify health inequalities.",
keywords = "HIV prevention, gay men, MSM, rapid result HIV self-test",
author = "P. Flowers and J. Riddell and C. Park and B. Ahmed and I. Young and J. Frankis and M. Davis and M. Gilbert and C. Estcourt and L. Wallace and L.M. McDaid",
note = "Acceptance date: from VoR Used last date in month to get full pub date ET 29/7/19 Funding: LM and JR are funded by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) at the MRC/CSO Social & Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow (MC_UU_12017/11). The 2014 Gay Men’s Sexual Health Survey was funded by the MRC (MC_UU_12017/2) and Health Protection Scotland. We thank the survey staff and field workers in each city, the venue managers, their staff, and the men who agreed to participate in the survey. The qualitative study was funded by a collaboration between NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, NHS Ayrshire and Arran and NHS Lanarkshire.",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1111/hiv.12420",
language = "English",
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pages = "245–255",
journal = "HIV Medicine",
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Preparedness for use of the rapid result HIV self-test by gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM): a mixed methods exploratory study among MSM and those involved in HIV prevention and care. / Flowers, P.; Riddell, J.; Park, C.; Ahmed, B.; Young, I.; Frankis, J.; Davis, M.; Gilbert, M.; Estcourt, C.; Wallace, L.; McDaid, L.M.

In: HIV Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 4, 30.04.2017, p. 245–255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Preparedness for use of the rapid result HIV self-test by gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM): a mixed methods exploratory study among MSM and those involved in HIV prevention and care

AU - Flowers, P.

AU - Riddell, J.

AU - Park, C.

AU - Ahmed, B.

AU - Young, I.

AU - Frankis, J.

AU - Davis, M.

AU - Gilbert, M.

AU - Estcourt, C.

AU - Wallace, L.

AU - McDaid, L.M.

N1 - Acceptance date: from VoR Used last date in month to get full pub date ET 29/7/19 Funding: LM and JR are funded by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) at the MRC/CSO Social & Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow (MC_UU_12017/11). The 2014 Gay Men’s Sexual Health Survey was funded by the MRC (MC_UU_12017/2) and Health Protection Scotland. We thank the survey staff and field workers in each city, the venue managers, their staff, and the men who agreed to participate in the survey. The qualitative study was funded by a collaboration between NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, NHS Ayrshire and Arran and NHS Lanarkshire.

PY - 2017/4/30

Y1 - 2017/4/30

N2 - ObjectivesThe aim of the study was to explore preparedness for the HIV self-test among men who have sexwith men (MSM) and those involved in HIV prevention and care.MethodsA mixed methods exploratory research design was employed, detailing awareness and willingnessto use the self-test and the perceived barriers and facilitators to implementation. Quantitative andqualitative data collection and analysis were completed in parallel. Descriptive and inferentialanalysis of cross-sectional bar-based survey data collected from MSM through a self-completed questionnaire and oral fluid specimen collection (n = 999) was combined with qualitative,thematic, analysis of data collected through 12 expert focus groups (n = 55) consisting of gaymen, National Health Service (NHS) staff, community organizations, entrepreneurs and activists.Findings were subsequently combined and assessed for synergies.ResultsAmong MSM, self-test awareness was moderate (55%). Greater awareness was associated with increasededucational attainment [adjusted odds ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00–2.30; P = 0.05] andprevious history of sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing (adjusted odds ratio 1.63; 95% CI 1.11–2.39; P = 0.01). Willingness to use the test was high (89%) and associated with meeting sexual partnersonline (unadjusted odds ratio 1.96; 95% CI 1.31–2.94; P < 0.001). Experts highlighted the overallacceptability of self-testing; it was understood as convenient, discreet, accessible, and with a low burdento services. However, some ambivalence towards self-testing was reported; it could reduce opportunitiesto engage with wider services, wider health issues and the determinants of risk.ConclusionsSelf-testing represents an opportunity to reduce barriers to HIV testing and enhance preventionand access to care. Levels of awareness are moderate but willingness to use is high. Self-testingmay amplify health inequalities.

AB - ObjectivesThe aim of the study was to explore preparedness for the HIV self-test among men who have sexwith men (MSM) and those involved in HIV prevention and care.MethodsA mixed methods exploratory research design was employed, detailing awareness and willingnessto use the self-test and the perceived barriers and facilitators to implementation. Quantitative andqualitative data collection and analysis were completed in parallel. Descriptive and inferentialanalysis of cross-sectional bar-based survey data collected from MSM through a self-completed questionnaire and oral fluid specimen collection (n = 999) was combined with qualitative,thematic, analysis of data collected through 12 expert focus groups (n = 55) consisting of gaymen, National Health Service (NHS) staff, community organizations, entrepreneurs and activists.Findings were subsequently combined and assessed for synergies.ResultsAmong MSM, self-test awareness was moderate (55%). Greater awareness was associated with increasededucational attainment [adjusted odds ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00–2.30; P = 0.05] andprevious history of sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing (adjusted odds ratio 1.63; 95% CI 1.11–2.39; P = 0.01). Willingness to use the test was high (89%) and associated with meeting sexual partnersonline (unadjusted odds ratio 1.96; 95% CI 1.31–2.94; P < 0.001). Experts highlighted the overallacceptability of self-testing; it was understood as convenient, discreet, accessible, and with a low burdento services. However, some ambivalence towards self-testing was reported; it could reduce opportunitiesto engage with wider services, wider health issues and the determinants of risk.ConclusionsSelf-testing represents an opportunity to reduce barriers to HIV testing and enhance preventionand access to care. Levels of awareness are moderate but willingness to use is high. Self-testingmay amplify health inequalities.

KW - HIV prevention

KW - gay men

KW - MSM

KW - rapid result HIV self-test

U2 - 10.1111/hiv.12420

DO - 10.1111/hiv.12420

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 245

EP - 255

JO - HIV Medicine

JF - HIV Medicine

SN - 1464-2662

IS - 4

ER -