Preferences for involvement in treatment decision making of patients with cancer: a review of the literature

Gill Hubbard, Lisa Kidd, Edward Donaghy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A systematic review of the literature about patients’ preferences for involvement in cancer treatment decision making was conducted. Establishing preferences is important if the aim is to make health care more sensitive to the needs and expectations of each individual patient. Thirty-one papers were included in the review. Generalising from this literature is problematic because of limitations related to sample size, sample composition and methods used to assess preferences. Whilst we take cognizance of these limitations, research suggests that preferences vary considerably and that whilst most patients prefer a collaborative role, a significant minority prefer a passive or active role.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-318
Number of pages20
JournalEuropean Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2008

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Decision Making
Patient Preference
Sample Size
Neoplasms
Delivery of Health Care
Therapeutics
Research

Keywords

  • cancer treatment
  • decision making

Cite this

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Preferences for involvement in treatment decision making of patients with cancer: a review of the literature. / Hubbard, Gill; Kidd, Lisa; Donaghy, Edward.

In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.09.2008, p. 299-318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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