Physical function and health-related quality of life in older adults with or at risk of mobility disability post-discharge: 8-month follow-up of a randomised controlled trial

Sylvia Sunde*, Karin Hesseberg, Dawn A. Skelton, Anette H. Ranhoff, Are H. Pripp, Marit Aarønæs , Therese Brovold

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate physical function and health-related quality of life 4 months after the cessation of a 4-month exercise intervention in 89 older adults after discharge from hospital. Linear mixed regression models were used to evaluate between-group differences. Data were analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle. There was no statistically significant between-group difference in the Short Physical Performance Battery (mean difference 0.5 points, 95% confidence interval [−0.6, 1.5], p = .378). There was a statistically significant difference in favor of the intervention group in functional capacity (the 6-min walk test; mean difference 32.9 m, 95% confidence interval [1.5, 64.3], p = .040) and physical health–related quality of life (physical component summary of medical outcome Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey; mean difference 5.9 points, 95% confidence interval [2.0, 9.7], p = .003). Interventions aiming to maintain or increase physical function and health-related quality of life should be encouraged in this population.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Early online date11 Sep 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Sep 2021

Keywords

  • ageing
  • exercise
  • post-discharge
  • quality of life
  • mobility disability
  • physical function
  • hospitalization
  • exercise interventions
  • healthy aging

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