Perceptions of segregation and substance use behaviours in adolescence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Segregation is pervasive in Northern Ireland, and linked with health and health behaviors. This study aimed to explore the relationship between adolescents' reports of religious residential segregation and substance use. Methods: A secondary analysis of data from 560 young people from the 2008 Northern Ireland Young Life and Times Survey. Results: Segregation was associated with solvent and illicit drug use, but not cigarette or alcohol use. Relationships differed by religious group membership, and by perceived majority status. Catholic adolescents who reported a Protestant majority were more likely to have used solvents. Protestant adolescents who reported a Protestant majority were more likely to have used illicit drugs. Conclusions: This analysis revealed associations between residential segregation and substance use that were sensitive to religious group membership, and perceived majority group status. This highlights a need for further work to understand the nature of segregation and influence on well-being in divided societies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-301
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse
Volume24
Issue number5
Early online date10 Jun 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Sep 2015

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • Northern Ireland
  • substance use

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