Operationalising the capability approach as an outcome measure in public health: The development of the OCAP-18

Paula Lorgelly, Karen Lorimer, Elisabeth Fenwick, Andrew Briggs, Paul Anand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There is growing interest in operationalising the capability approach to measure quality of life. This paper reports the results of a research project undertaken in 2007 that sought to reduce and refine a longer survey in order to provide a summary measure of wellbeing and capability in the realm of public health. The reduction and refinement of the questionnaire took place across a number of stages, using both qualitative (five focus group discussions and 17 in-depth interviews) and quantitative (secondary data analysis, N = 1048 and primary data collection using postal surveys and interviews, N = 45) approaches. The questionnaire was reduced from its original 60+ questions to 24 questions (including demographic questions). Each of Nussbaum's ten Central Human Capabilities are measured using one (or more) of the 18 specific capability items which are included in the questionnaire (referred to as the OCAP-18). Analysis of the questionnaire responses (N = 198) found that respondents differed with respect to the levels of capabilities they reported, and that these capabilities appear to be sensitive to one's gender, age, income and deprivation decile.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68–81
Number of pages14
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume142
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015

Fingerprint

Public Health
public health
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
questionnaire
secondary analysis
interview
deprivation
group discussion
quality of life
Interviews
data analysis
research project
income
Surveys and Questionnaires
Capability Approach
Focus Groups
gender
Questionnaire
Quality of Life
Demography

Keywords

  • capabilities
  • public health
  • quality of life

Cite this

Lorgelly, Paula ; Lorimer, Karen ; Fenwick, Elisabeth ; Briggs, Andrew ; Anand, Paul. / Operationalising the capability approach as an outcome measure in public health: The development of the OCAP-18. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 142. pp. 68–81.
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Operationalising the capability approach as an outcome measure in public health: The development of the OCAP-18. / Lorgelly, Paula; Lorimer, Karen; Fenwick, Elisabeth; Briggs, Andrew; Anand, Paul.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 142, 10.2015, p. 68–81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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