Neighbourhood deprivation and quality of life among people with diabetes in England

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Background: Income levels and Socio-economic status at the individual level are known to be associated with adverse health outcomes including risk of diabetes and its complications. However it is unclear how neighbourhood deprivation levels influence perceived quality of life among people with diabetes. This study investigated the relationship between neighbourhood deprivation and quality of life among people with diabetes attending two hospital trusts in Liverpool, England. Methods: eligible participants completed a set of study questionnaires including demographic characteristics and the Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life questionnaire. Postcode based neighbourhood deprivation data were obtained from the UK’s Department for Communities and Local Government website. Relevant statistical analyses were undertaken using SPSS version 22. Results: a total of 123 people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes participated in the study. Majority of participants were type 2 diabetes patients (53%) and about half were men (51%). Overall 20% of participants reported poor quality of life. Compared to those with type 2 diabetes, a higher proportion of people with type 1 diabetes reported good quality of life (58% vs. 61%; p<0.05). Poor neighbourhood deprivation was associated with poor quality of life, both in univariate and multivariate analysis (p<0.05). However, there was no significant association between neighbourhood deprivation and patients’ perceptions of how diabetes affected their quality of life (p>0.05). Conclusion: Neighbourhood deprivation levels are significantly associated with quality of life among people with diabetes and could potentially be used to guide interventions aimed at promoting their health and well-being.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 27 Jun 2018

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Keywords

  • diabetes
  • deprivation
  • England

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