Multimodal trajectory playback for teaching shape information and trajectories to visually impaired computer users

Andrew Crossan, Stephen A. Brewster

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    There are difficulties in presenting nontextual or dynamic information to blind or visually impaired users through computers. This article examines the potential of haptic and auditory trajectory playback as a method of teaching shapes and gestures to visually impaired people. Two studies are described which test the success of teaching simple shapes. The first study examines haptic trajectory playback alone, played through a force-feedback device, and compares performance of visually impaired users with sighted users. It demonstrates that the task is significantly harder for visually impaired users. The second study builds on these results, combining force-feedback with audio to teach visually impaired users to recreate shapes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number12
    JournalACM Transactions on Accessible Computing
    Volume1
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2008

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    Keywords

    • visual impairment
    • shape information
    • computer science

    Cite this

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    Multimodal trajectory playback for teaching shape information and trajectories to visually impaired computer users. / Crossan, Andrew; Brewster, Stephen A.

    In: ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing, Vol. 1, No. 2, 12, 10.2008.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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