Multifaceted self-management interventions for older women with urinary incontinence: a systematic review and narrative synthesis

Yu Fu*, E. Andrea Nelson, Linda McGowan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective
To synthesise the evidence for the multifaceted self-management interventions for older women with urinary incontinence (UI) and to understand the outcomes associated with these interventions.

Design
A systematic review and narrative synthesis to identify randomised controlled trials that investigated the effect of multifaceted self-management interventions for older women with UI.

Methods
MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts databases were searched (January 1990 to May 2019) using a systematic search strategy, complemented by manually screening the reference lists and citation indexes. Study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were undertaken independently. A narrative synthesis was undertaken in which studies, interventions and outcomes were examined based on the intervention components. The effect size and 95% CI were estimated from each study.

Results
A total of 13 147 citations were identified and 16 studies were included. There was no study rated as of high quality. Three types of multifaceted interventions were found: those that had an element of pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME), those with bladder retraining and some with combination behavioural interventions. Outcome measures varied across studies. A statistically significant improvement in incontinence symptoms was reported in the intervention group compared with the control in 15 studies.

Conclusion
Multifaceted interventions that included PFME, bladder retraining or combination behavioural techniques appear to be useful in some settings for UI management in older women, but the quality of the evidence was poor and unclear. There was insufficient evidence to determine whether any of the combination of components is superior to others in improving UI symptoms. There is a need for high-quality studies to confirm the effectiveness of these interventions and to identify comparative effectiveness.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere028626
Number of pages15
JournalBMJ Open
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Aug 2019

Keywords

  • urinary incontinence
  • older women
  • multifaceted self-management interventions
  • systematic review

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