Motor recovery after stroke: a systematic review

Peter Langhorne, Fiona Coupar, Alex Pollock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Loss of functional movement is a common consequence of stroke for which a wide range of interventions has been developed. In this Review, we aimed to provide an overview of the available evidence on interventions for motor recovery after stroke through the evaluation of systematic reviews, supplemented by recent randomised controlled trials. Most trials were small and had some design limitations. Improvements in recovery of arm function were seen for constraint-induced movement therapy, electromyographic biofeedback, mental practice with motor imagery, and robotics. Improvements in transfer ability or balance were seen with repetitive task training, biofeedback, and training with a moving platform. Physical fitness training, high-intensity therapy (usually physiotherapy), and repetitive task training improved walking speed. Although the existing evidence is limited by poor trial designs, some treatments do show promise for improving motor recovery, particularly those that have focused on high-intensity and repetitive task-specific practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)741-754
Number of pages14
JournalLancet Neurology
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2009

Keywords

  • stroke
  • motor recovery
  • neurology
  • rehabilitation

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