Mobilizing traditional music in the rural creative economy of Argyll and Bute, Scotland

Simon McKerrell*, Jasmine Hornabrook

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper examines the key issues that emerge in the understanding of traditional music as micro-enterprise in the rural creative economy of Argyll and Bute, Scotland. Using evidence from detailed ethnographic fieldwork, with musicians, festival organisers, tour operators, business owners and civil servants, this paper examines how issues such as geographical and social distance, internet connectivity, and cultural tourism are understood in relation to the musical life of Argyll and Bute. We advocate for greater ethnographic engagement with local communities in order to provide a more sophisticated, real-world understanding of rural cultural policy and the impact of current policies on local musicians. The paper therefore foregrounds ethnography as an important method in local, rural contexts such as Argyll and Bute, where typically, much of the creative economy is embedded in statistically invisible economic and cultural activity and portfolio employment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCreative Industries Journal
Early online date1 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Jun 2021

Keywords

  • rural
  • creative economy
  • Scotland
  • music
  • traditional music
  • micro-enterprise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Strategy and Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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