Mindfulness for people with long-term conditions and their family caregivers: A systematic review

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background and purpose: People with long-term conditions and their family caregivers can experience psychological difficulties. Mindfulness improves psychological wellbeing, but people with long-term conditions and their family caregivers rarely learn mindfulness together. This review systematically reviewed the therapeutic effects for people with long-term conditions and their family caregivers learning MBIs together in a partnership. The review asked what changes in psychological wellbeing or interpersonal factors do people with long-term conditions and their family caregivers experience when learning MBI together?

Methods: CINAHL, Medline, Nursing and Allied Health Database, PsycARTICLES, Psychology Database, PsycINFO were searched (1980-2017). Data were extracted and quality appraisal completed.

Results: The search identified 4008 studies, which reduced to 9 after screening. The review included varied designs: qualitative (n=2), quantitative (n=6), and mixed methods (n=1). Different conditions and various forms of partnerships were included. Mindfulness can alleviate psychological symptoms. Learning mindfulness in a partnership might improve dyadic coping and/or engagement with mindfulness. Results were sometimes contradictory and questions remain about the value of delivering mindfulness in a partnership.

Conclusions: Learning mindfulness in a partnership can improve psychological wellbeing, but improvements are often small and not experienced by everyone. Learning in a partnership can improve engagement with mindfulness and improve dyadic coping, but these findings are inconclusive and need further exploration.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-86
Number of pages11
JournalComplementary Therapies in Clinical Practice
Volume34
Early online date1 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

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Mindfulness
Caregivers
Psychology
Learning
Databases
Therapeutic Uses
Nursing
Health

Keywords

  • mindfulness
  • long-term conditions
  • psychological wellbeing
  • caregivers
  • partnership
  • systematic review

Cite this

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title = "Mindfulness for people with long-term conditions and their family caregivers: A systematic review",
abstract = "Background and purpose: People with long-term conditions and their family caregivers can experience psychological difficulties. Mindfulness improves psychological wellbeing, but people with long-term conditions and their family caregivers rarely learn mindfulness together. This review systematically reviewed the therapeutic effects for people with long-term conditions and their family caregivers learning MBIs together in a partnership. The review asked what changes in psychological wellbeing or interpersonal factors do people with long-term conditions and their family caregivers experience when learning MBI together?Methods: CINAHL, Medline, Nursing and Allied Health Database, PsycARTICLES, Psychology Database, PsycINFO were searched (1980-2017). Data were extracted and quality appraisal completed.Results: The search identified 4008 studies, which reduced to 9 after screening. The review included varied designs: qualitative (n=2), quantitative (n=6), and mixed methods (n=1). Different conditions and various forms of partnerships were included. Mindfulness can alleviate psychological symptoms. Learning mindfulness in a partnership might improve dyadic coping and/or engagement with mindfulness. Results were sometimes contradictory and questions remain about the value of delivering mindfulness in a partnership. Conclusions: Learning mindfulness in a partnership can improve psychological wellbeing, but improvements are often small and not experienced by everyone. Learning in a partnership can improve engagement with mindfulness and improve dyadic coping, but these findings are inconclusive and need further exploration.",
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Mindfulness for people with long-term conditions and their family caregivers: A systematic review. / Parkinson, Ben; Lawrence, Maggie; Mcelhinney, Evelyn; Booth, Jo.

In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Vol. 34, 02.2019, p. 76-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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