Measuring activity and participation outcomes for children and youth with acquired brain injury: an occupational therapy perspective

Carolyn Dunford, Katrina Bannigan, Lorna Wales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction:
Intervention outcomes for children and youth with acquired brain injuries should be measured in terms of participation in activities. The aim of this study was to explore the occupational therapy outcome measures used with this group.

Method:
One cycle of an action research study, which focused specifically on occupational therapists, is reported. Ten occupational therapists working with children and youth with acquired brain injuries collated the outcome measures they used and mapped their frequently used measures onto the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health — Children and Youth, using established linking rules.

Findings:
Forty-two outcome measures and assessments were identified. Of these, 19 were used frequently and 15 were used as outcome measures. All activity and participation domains were represented, with learning and applying knowledge, mobility, communication and self-care (except looking after one's health) particularly well covered.

Conclusion:
Occupational therapists are using measures that reflect the domains of activity and participation, unlike those previously identified which were linked predominantly to body functions. The importance of occupational therapists working in rehabilitation teams is reiterated in that some of the domains that are not covered by occupational therapists impact on participation, for example, pain.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-76
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Occupational Therapy
Volume76
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2013

Keywords

  • young people
  • adolescent
  • paediatrics

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