Mapping evidence from the literature about the experience of internationally educated health professionals to Canadian professional competency profiles of physiotherapists, occupational therapists, physicians, and pharmacists

Michael E. Kalu, Ukachukwu O. Abaraogu, Kathleen E. Norman Dr

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Abstract

Abstract Purpose: To review experiences of internationally educated healthcare professionals (physiotherapists, occupational therapists, physicians and pharmacists) in their new country and to map these experiences using a competency framework. Method: Database (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO ) were systematically searched to include articles published between 2000 and 2017 and described the experiences of internationally educated healthcare professionals (IEHPs) in physiotherapists, occupational therapists, physicians and pharmacist in attaining registration in new country. The data were synthesised using conventional content analysis. Emerging themes were mapped across a competency framework based on the profiles of the selected professions. Result: Thirteen articles were included; most were conducted in Canada and among internationally educated medical doctors. Themes were mapped to all the roles in the professional competency profiles except the Health Advocate role. Communicator role was the most frequently discussed; internationally educated healthcare professionals often needed to improve in culture-specific communication including verbal and non-verbal cues during assessment, documentation and treatment of clients. A pictorial representation was created for describing internationally educated healthcare professionals’ deficiencies in roles/ competencies for professional practice. In this representation, cultural-language and confidence deficits contribute to the deficiencies seen in roles and competencies among internationally educated healthcare professionals in their new country. Conclusion: Internationally educated healthcare professionals’ ability to fulfill the explicit roles in the competency profiles may depend largely on having good cultural-language competence as well as confidence. Exposing the internationally educated healthcare professionals to local practice is one of the strategies for cultural-language and confidence enhancement, consistent with findings reported in the nursing profession.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13
JournalInternet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019

Keywords

  • international educated health care professionals
  • professional competency profiles
  • international mobility
  • Medicine
  • Nursing
  • International mobility
  • Competence (human resources)

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