Is high frequency ultrasound a useful process to add value to out of specification strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries industrially?

Matthew Hooper, Alison D. McNeilly, Carl Schaschke, Jonathan D. Wilkin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Bioactive ingredients can be extracted from surplus soft fruits to add value to them as a fortification ingredient in many new products. Ultrasound assisted extraction and spray drying have been heavily studied in the past, with evidence to suggest the positive uptake of these by the food industry. In this paper, strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries were examined using a distilled water ‘green’ extraction method with assisted high frequency ultrasound and concentration through spray drying. The results showed that crop year and variety had more impact on bioactive concentration than extraction through high frequency ultrasound. Two different machines were examined for differences between a cold extraction of water, and a 700 and 2000 Hz industrially relevant probes. Typically, Total Phenolic Content (TPC) was lower in strawberry and blackberries than the control for both methods, however raspberry had a higher GAE mg/ml for the 2000 Hz ultrasound than the control. For Radical scavenging (RS) percentage using DPPH Blackberries had higher RS % than the control, whereas strawberry and raspberry had less than the control. These results suggest that ultrasound as a singular method for extracting valuable bioactive ingredients is not suitable with water as the solvent.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Food Science and Technology
Early online date19 Aug 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19 Aug 2022

Keywords

  • antioxidants
  • total phenolics
  • ultrasonication
  • spray drying

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