Is asymptomatic non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis associated with significant clinical consequences in men and their sexual partners: a systematic review

J. M. Saunders, G. Hart, C. S. Estcourt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Opinions are divided on whether to screen asymptomatic men for non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis (NCNGU). We systematically reviewed the literature to determine whether male asymptomatic NCNGU is associated with significant clinical outcomes for men and/or their sexual partners. We searched electronic databases and reference lists from retrieved articles and reviews. No studies reporting clinical outcomes in men with asymptomatic NCNGU were identified. Two eligible studies report rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in female partners of men with asymptomatic NCNGU; Chlamydia trachomatis was detected in 2.4% and 8.3% of these women. The evidence available is insufficient in quality and breadth to enable us to conclude whether asymptomatic NCNGU is associated with significant health consequences for men or their sexual partners; however, clinical consequences of asymptomatic NCNGU are poorly investigated. Clinicians should be aware of the limitations of the evidence on which current screening guidelines for asymptomatic men are based.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)338-341
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Asymptomatic
  • Men
  • Non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis (NCNGU)
  • Non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU)
  • Non-specific urethritis (NSU)
  • Review
  • Screening
  • Systematic
  • Urethritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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