Investigating the contribution of community empowerment policies to successful co-production: evidence from Scotland

Artur Steiner*, Carolyn McMillan, Clementine Hill O'Connor

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Although frequently perceived as a ‘woolly’ policy concept and a means to reduce public service delivery costs, co-production can lead to increased quality and efficiency of services. In this paper, we explore the contribution of a community empowerment policy to co-production processes. Analysing empirical findings from a mixed-method, longitudinal study through the lens of Myers et al.’s (2017) Theory of Change, the paper develops a model of a successful co-production process. We show that changes in working practices and shifts in power can create friction between co-producing actors. By critiquing specific policies, we inform future co-production research, policy, and practice.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages24
JournalPublic Management Review
Early online date3 Feb 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 Feb 2022

Keywords

  • community empowerment
  • co-production
  • participation request
  • public policies

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