Inter-generational concordance of smoking status between mothers and young people aged 10–15 in the UK

K. McAloney*, H. Graham, C. Law, L. Platt, H. Wardle

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Smoking habits are laid down in adolescence,1 a habit that will kill half of those who continue to smoke through adulthood. Having a parent, and particularly a mother, who smokes, elevates the risk of adolescent smoking.2, 3 and 4 Both maternal and adolescent smoking statuses are, in turn, related to wider familial factors. Poorer family circumstances increases the risk of adolescent smoking;5 compared to young people living with both parents, those in lone-mother families are also more likely to be smokers.4 In addition, there are marked ethnic differences in adolescent smoking; for example in the UK, prevalence is lower among Asian and African-Caribbean groups than in white groups6 and in the US, rates are lower among African-Americans than among both Hispanic and white groups.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)831–833
Number of pages3
JournalPublic Health
Volume128
Issue number9
Early online date29 Aug 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

Keywords

  • smoking
  • public health
  • young people

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