Influencing expert judgment: attributions of crime causality

Jennifer Murray, Mary E. Thomson, David J. Cooke, Kathy E. Charles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present research aimed to investigate the effects of attribution on expert clinical judgment in comparison to semi-experts and laypeople. Two research questions were addressed. First, would experts be less subject to attributional manipulations, in terms of their perceived ratings of dangerousness, than would semi-experts or laypeople? Second, would experts be less subject to attributional manipulations, in terms of their assessments of offender responsibility, than would semi-experts or laypeople?

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)126-143
Number of pages18
JournalLegal and Criminological Psychology
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2011

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Crime
Causality
Dangerous Behavior
Research

Keywords

  • expert judgement
  • crime causality
  • psychology
  • attribution

Cite this

Murray, J., Thomson, M. E., Cooke, D. J., & Charles, K. E. (2011). Influencing expert judgment: attributions of crime causality. Legal and Criminological Psychology, 16(1), 126-143. https://doi.org/10.1348/135532510X490183
Murray, Jennifer ; Thomson, Mary E. ; Cooke, David J. ; Charles, Kathy E. / Influencing expert judgment: attributions of crime causality. In: Legal and Criminological Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 126-143.
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Murray, J, Thomson, ME, Cooke, DJ & Charles, KE 2011, 'Influencing expert judgment: attributions of crime causality', Legal and Criminological Psychology, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 126-143. https://doi.org/10.1348/135532510X490183

Influencing expert judgment: attributions of crime causality. / Murray, Jennifer; Thomson, Mary E.; Cooke, David J.; Charles, Kathy E.

In: Legal and Criminological Psychology, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.02.2011, p. 126-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Murray J, Thomson ME, Cooke DJ, Charles KE. Influencing expert judgment: attributions of crime causality. Legal and Criminological Psychology. 2011 Feb 1;16(1):126-143. https://doi.org/10.1348/135532510X490183