Industrial homes, domestic factories: the convergence of public and private space in interwar Britain

Vicky Long

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In Britain, this vision of the “homely” factory—a term deployed to connote a
sense of coziness and to evoke the atmosphere of the domestic home—was promoted by women factory inspectors, industrial welfare supervisors, companies, and advertisers seeking to reconcile modernity with tradition, to imbue mass-produced goods with an individualized handcrafted aura, and to resolve industrial labor problems. Its origins can be traced back to the nineteenth century, when reformers from a range of social and political persuasions protested that workers had become alienated by the scale of industrial production and the subdivision of the labor process and were manifesting their discontent in disorderly conduct, apathy, and industrial “warfare.”
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)434-464
Number of pages30
JournalJournal of British Studies
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

Keywords

  • interwar Britain
  • British history
  • twentieth-century

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