Health-related quality of life in home care recipients after a falls prevention intervention: a 6 month follow-up

Maria Bjerk, Therese Brovold, Jennifer C Davis, Dawn A Skelton, Astrid Bergland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Falls in older adults are an increasingly important public health concern due to the expanding older population and contribute considerably to the global burden of disease. Home care recipients have a high incidence of falls and a low level of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). In this understudied group of older adults, exercise interventions could prevent falls, promote HRQOL and enable healthy ageing in the longer term.
Methods: The study is a single-blinded parallel-group randomized controlled trial, lasting 3 months with a follow-up at 6 months, conducted in primary care. The objective was to explore the effects of a falls prevention exercise programme post-intervention at a 6-month follow-up in home care recipients 67+ years with a history of falls. The Otago Exercise Programme lasting 3 months was performed. The primary outcome was HRQOL measured by the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). Linear mixed regression models and structural equation models were employed.
Results: At 6-month follow-up, the intervention group scored significantly higher on SF-36’s physical component summary compared with the controls; 3.0 points, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.4, 5.6. This effect was mediated by an increased probability of maintaining exercise in the post-intervention period; odds ratio = 2.3 (CI = 1.1, 5.1). Exercising was associated with a 7.1-point increase in physical component summary (CI = 3.2, 10.9).
Conclusion: A falls prevention exercise programme can improve physical HRQOL in home care recipients post-intervention. The exercise programme also led to longer-term changes in exercise behaviour mediating this effect.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberckz106
JournalEuropean Journal of Public Health
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Home Care Services
Quality of Life
Confidence Intervals
Structural Models
Health Surveys
Health Status
Linear Models
Primary Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Public Health
Odds Ratio
Incidence
Population

Keywords

  • exercise
  • follow-up
  • home care services
  • public health medicine
  • elderly
  • health-related quality of life
  • fall prevention
  • SF-36
  • primary outcome measure

Cite this

@article{4f97c592df4a4058ab1a0772d6f3e15a,
title = "Health-related quality of life in home care recipients after a falls prevention intervention: a 6 month follow-up",
abstract = "Background: Falls in older adults are an increasingly important public health concern due to the expanding older population and contribute considerably to the global burden of disease. Home care recipients have a high incidence of falls and a low level of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). In this understudied group of older adults, exercise interventions could prevent falls, promote HRQOL and enable healthy ageing in the longer term.Methods: The study is a single-blinded parallel-group randomized controlled trial, lasting 3 months with a follow-up at 6 months, conducted in primary care. The objective was to explore the effects of a falls prevention exercise programme post-intervention at a 6-month follow-up in home care recipients 67+ years with a history of falls. The Otago Exercise Programme lasting 3 months was performed. The primary outcome was HRQOL measured by the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). Linear mixed regression models and structural equation models were employed.Results: At 6-month follow-up, the intervention group scored significantly higher on SF-36’s physical component summary compared with the controls; 3.0 points, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) = 0.4, 5.6. This effect was mediated by an increased probability of maintaining exercise in the post-intervention period; odds ratio = 2.3 (CI = 1.1, 5.1). Exercising was associated with a 7.1-point increase in physical component summary (CI = 3.2, 10.9).Conclusion: A falls prevention exercise programme can improve physical HRQOL in home care recipients post-intervention. The exercise programme also led to longer-term changes in exercise behaviour mediating this effect.",
keywords = "exercise, follow-up, home care services, public health medicine, elderly, health-related quality of life, fall prevention, SF-36, primary outcome measure",
author = "Maria Bjerk and Therese Brovold and Davis, {Jennifer C} and Skelton, {Dawn A} and Astrid Bergland",
note = "Acceptance in SAN AAM: 6m embargo Title of paper upon submission: Long-term Effect of a Falls Prevention Program on Health-related Quality of Life in Home Care Recipients",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1093/eurpub/ckz106",
language = "English",
journal = "European Journal of Public Health",
issn = "1101-1262",
publisher = "Oxford University Press (OUP)",

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Health-related quality of life in home care recipients after a falls prevention intervention: a 6 month follow-up. / Bjerk, Maria; Brovold, Therese; Davis, Jennifer C; Skelton, Dawn A; Bergland, Astrid.

In: European Journal of Public Health, 06.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Health-related quality of life in home care recipients after a falls prevention intervention: a 6 month follow-up

AU - Bjerk, Maria

AU - Brovold, Therese

AU - Davis, Jennifer C

AU - Skelton, Dawn A

AU - Bergland, Astrid

N1 - Acceptance in SAN AAM: 6m embargo Title of paper upon submission: Long-term Effect of a Falls Prevention Program on Health-related Quality of Life in Home Care Recipients

PY - 2019/6/6

Y1 - 2019/6/6

N2 - Background: Falls in older adults are an increasingly important public health concern due to the expanding older population and contribute considerably to the global burden of disease. Home care recipients have a high incidence of falls and a low level of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). In this understudied group of older adults, exercise interventions could prevent falls, promote HRQOL and enable healthy ageing in the longer term.Methods: The study is a single-blinded parallel-group randomized controlled trial, lasting 3 months with a follow-up at 6 months, conducted in primary care. The objective was to explore the effects of a falls prevention exercise programme post-intervention at a 6-month follow-up in home care recipients 67+ years with a history of falls. The Otago Exercise Programme lasting 3 months was performed. The primary outcome was HRQOL measured by the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). Linear mixed regression models and structural equation models were employed.Results: At 6-month follow-up, the intervention group scored significantly higher on SF-36’s physical component summary compared with the controls; 3.0 points, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.4, 5.6. This effect was mediated by an increased probability of maintaining exercise in the post-intervention period; odds ratio = 2.3 (CI = 1.1, 5.1). Exercising was associated with a 7.1-point increase in physical component summary (CI = 3.2, 10.9).Conclusion: A falls prevention exercise programme can improve physical HRQOL in home care recipients post-intervention. The exercise programme also led to longer-term changes in exercise behaviour mediating this effect.

AB - Background: Falls in older adults are an increasingly important public health concern due to the expanding older population and contribute considerably to the global burden of disease. Home care recipients have a high incidence of falls and a low level of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). In this understudied group of older adults, exercise interventions could prevent falls, promote HRQOL and enable healthy ageing in the longer term.Methods: The study is a single-blinded parallel-group randomized controlled trial, lasting 3 months with a follow-up at 6 months, conducted in primary care. The objective was to explore the effects of a falls prevention exercise programme post-intervention at a 6-month follow-up in home care recipients 67+ years with a history of falls. The Otago Exercise Programme lasting 3 months was performed. The primary outcome was HRQOL measured by the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). Linear mixed regression models and structural equation models were employed.Results: At 6-month follow-up, the intervention group scored significantly higher on SF-36’s physical component summary compared with the controls; 3.0 points, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.4, 5.6. This effect was mediated by an increased probability of maintaining exercise in the post-intervention period; odds ratio = 2.3 (CI = 1.1, 5.1). Exercising was associated with a 7.1-point increase in physical component summary (CI = 3.2, 10.9).Conclusion: A falls prevention exercise programme can improve physical HRQOL in home care recipients post-intervention. The exercise programme also led to longer-term changes in exercise behaviour mediating this effect.

KW - exercise

KW - follow-up

KW - home care services

KW - public health medicine

KW - elderly

KW - health-related quality of life

KW - fall prevention

KW - SF-36

KW - primary outcome measure

U2 - 10.1093/eurpub/ckz106

DO - 10.1093/eurpub/ckz106

M3 - Article

JO - European Journal of Public Health

JF - European Journal of Public Health

SN - 1101-1262

M1 - ckz106

ER -