Green infrastructure as an adaptation approach to tackle urban overheating in the Glasgow Clyde Valley Region

Rohinton Emmanuel, Alessandro Loconsole

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    Abstract

    Although urban growth in the city of Glasgow, UK, has subsided, urban morphology continues to generatelocal heat islands. We present a relatively less data-intense method to classify local climate zones (LCZ)and evaluate the effectiveness of green infrastructure options in tackling the likely overheating problemin cold climate urban agglomerations such as the Glasgow Clyde Valley (GCV) Region. LCZ classification uses LIDAR data available with local authorities, based on the typology developed by Stewart and Oke(2012). LCZ classes were then used cluster areas likely to exhibit similar warming trends locally. Thishelped to identify likely problem areas, a sub-set of which were then modelled for the effect of greencover options (both increase and reduction in green cover) as well as building density options. Resultsindicate green infrastructure could play a significant role in mitigating the urban overheating expectedunder a warming climate in the GCV Region. A green cover increase of approximately 20% over the presentlevel could eliminate a third to a half of the expected extra urban heat island effect in 2050. This levelof increase in green cover could also lead to local reductions in surface temperature by up to 2¿C. Overhalf of the street users would consider a 20% increase in green cover in the city centre to be thermallyacceptable, even under a warm 2050 scenario. The process adopted here could be used to estimate theoverheating problem as well as the effectiveness green infrastructure strategies to overcome them.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)71-86
    Number of pages16
    JournalLandscape and Urban Planning
    Volume138
    Early online date9 Mar 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2015

    Fingerprint

    infrastructure
    valley
    climate
    heat island
    warming
    urban morphology
    urban growth
    agglomeration
    typology
    surface temperature
    effect

    Keywords

    • urban heat island
    • urban vegetation
    • Green Area Ratio
    • local climate zone
    • CFD simulation

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Although urban growth in the city of Glasgow, UK, has subsided, urban morphology continues to generatelocal heat islands. We present a relatively less data-intense method to classify local climate zones (LCZ)and evaluate the effectiveness of green infrastructure options in tackling the likely overheating problemin cold climate urban agglomerations such as the Glasgow Clyde Valley (GCV) Region. LCZ classification uses LIDAR data available with local authorities, based on the typology developed by Stewart and Oke(2012). LCZ classes were then used cluster areas likely to exhibit similar warming trends locally. Thishelped to identify likely problem areas, a sub-set of which were then modelled for the effect of greencover options (both increase and reduction in green cover) as well as building density options. Resultsindicate green infrastructure could play a significant role in mitigating the urban overheating expectedunder a warming climate in the GCV Region. A green cover increase of approximately 20{\%} over the presentlevel could eliminate a third to a half of the expected extra urban heat island effect in 2050. This levelof increase in green cover could also lead to local reductions in surface temperature by up to 2¿C. Overhalf of the street users would consider a 20{\%} increase in green cover in the city centre to be thermallyacceptable, even under a warm 2050 scenario. The process adopted here could be used to estimate theoverheating problem as well as the effectiveness green infrastructure strategies to overcome them.",
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    Green infrastructure as an adaptation approach to tackle urban overheating in the Glasgow Clyde Valley Region. / Emmanuel, Rohinton; Loconsole, Alessandro.

    In: Landscape and Urban Planning, Vol. 138, 06.2015, p. 71-86.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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