Graduate Attributes & Talent Perceptions: Reflections on the First Year of Graduate Employment

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The effective management of talent in today’s global workplace is an organisational necessity (Barlow, 2006). Global skills shortage, particularly in high-end jobs is rife, with 50% of employers having difficulties filling positions in the last year (CIPD, 2013a). As the gulf between high and low skilled positions continues to widen, the term talent becomes more than the ability to work in high demand/low supply positions. Talent underlines personal qualities which boost organisational performance, over and above skills, knowledge and pervious experience (Sector Skills Development Agency, 2008: 3). Linkage between graduate qualities (attributes) and organisational talent is well documented (Connor and Shaw, 2008), with many global organisations seeking graduate talent to supply talent pipelines to ensure strategic succession for continued success. This paper considers the role of graduate talent in this provision, with particular emphasis on graduate perceptions on their transitional first year of employment post-graduation. Primary findings are based on the experiences of thirty members of the LinkedIn Alumni society of Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU). Adoption of an interpretavist approach facilitated the achievement of empathetic understanding of graduate talent across a wide range of social contexts, with an action research strategy engaging the researcher in both research outcomes and practical interventions simultaneously. Empirical data was collected via an on-line survey method to a graduate LinkedIn sample of thirty respondents, with emergent themes providing the basis of recommendations for all stakeholders in the employability debate.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)39-59
    Number of pages21
    JournalInternational Journal of Employment Studies
    VolumeVol 22
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

    Fingerprint

    Graduate employment
    Employability
    Work place
    Research strategy
    Social context
    Skill development
    Skills shortages
    Employers
    Linkage
    Organizational performance
    Stakeholders
    Outcomes research
    Graduation
    Quality attributes
    Empirical data

    Keywords

    • graduate skills
    • employability
    • talent management

    Cite this

    Scott, B. (2014). Graduate Attributes & Talent Perceptions: Reflections on the First Year of Graduate Employment. International Journal of Employment Studies, Vol 22(1), 39-59.
    Scott, Bernadette. / Graduate Attributes & Talent Perceptions: Reflections on the First Year of Graduate Employment. In: International Journal of Employment Studies. 2014 ; Vol. Vol 22, No. 1. pp. 39-59.
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    Scott, B 2014, 'Graduate Attributes & Talent Perceptions: Reflections on the First Year of Graduate Employment', International Journal of Employment Studies, vol. Vol 22, no. 1, pp. 39-59.

    Graduate Attributes & Talent Perceptions: Reflections on the First Year of Graduate Employment. / Scott, Bernadette.

    In: International Journal of Employment Studies, Vol. Vol 22, No. 1, 09.2014, p. 39-59.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    T1 - Graduate Attributes & Talent Perceptions: Reflections on the First Year of Graduate Employment

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    AB - The effective management of talent in today’s global workplace is an organisational necessity (Barlow, 2006). Global skills shortage, particularly in high-end jobs is rife, with 50% of employers having difficulties filling positions in the last year (CIPD, 2013a). As the gulf between high and low skilled positions continues to widen, the term talent becomes more than the ability to work in high demand/low supply positions. Talent underlines personal qualities which boost organisational performance, over and above skills, knowledge and pervious experience (Sector Skills Development Agency, 2008: 3). Linkage between graduate qualities (attributes) and organisational talent is well documented (Connor and Shaw, 2008), with many global organisations seeking graduate talent to supply talent pipelines to ensure strategic succession for continued success. This paper considers the role of graduate talent in this provision, with particular emphasis on graduate perceptions on their transitional first year of employment post-graduation. Primary findings are based on the experiences of thirty members of the LinkedIn Alumni society of Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU). Adoption of an interpretavist approach facilitated the achievement of empathetic understanding of graduate talent across a wide range of social contexts, with an action research strategy engaging the researcher in both research outcomes and practical interventions simultaneously. Empirical data was collected via an on-line survey method to a graduate LinkedIn sample of thirty respondents, with emergent themes providing the basis of recommendations for all stakeholders in the employability debate.

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    Scott B. Graduate Attributes & Talent Perceptions: Reflections on the First Year of Graduate Employment. International Journal of Employment Studies. 2014 Sep;Vol 22(1):39-59.