Global hepatitis C elimination: an investment framework

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Summary
The World Health Organization (WHO) has set global targets for the elimination of hepatitis B and hepatitis C as a public health threat by 2030. However, investment in elimination programs remains low. To drive political commitment and catalyse domestic and international financing, we developed the first global investment framework for the elimination of hepatitis B and hepatitis C. This manuscript focuses on the hepatitis C investment framework. The work was accompanied by modelling demonstrating the cost of scaling up hepatitis C-specific elimination activities to meet WHO’s targets, considering both direct and indirect economic benefits. The investment framework outlines national and international activities that will enable reductions in hepatitis C incidence and mortality and identifies potential sources of funding and tools to help countries build the economic case for investing in national elimination activities. The modelling demonstrated how strengthening health systems, through improving workforce capacity and surveillance systems and integrating activities into universal health programs, can improve coordination and optimize resource allocation, making hepatitis C elimination cost-saving by 2027, with a net economic benefit of US$22.7 ($17.1-27.9) billion by 2030. This is the first global investment framework for hepatitis C elimination; it demonstrates a way forward for countries, particularly those with limited resources, to gain the substantial economic benefit and cost savings that come from investing in hepatitis C elimination.

Funding: This work received funding from the Qatar Foundation as part of their support for the World Innovations Summit for Health, 2018. The funders had no role in the decision to publish or the preparation of the manuscript. This work received no NIH funding, and no authors are employed by NIH, or receipt funding from an NIH grant for this work.

Search strategy and selection criteria
References published between 2010 and May 1, 2019 were identified through searches of PubMed, MEDLINE; EMBASE and grey literature, using the search terms “viral hepatitis”, “hepatitis C”, “prevention”, “testing”, “treatment”, “elimination”, “financing”, “economic modelling” and “cost-effectiveness”. In addition, we reviewed published case studies, reports and interviewed global experts including epidemiologists, clinicians, community advocates, public health experts and policymakers, to inform the framework and identify countries that have achieved viral elimination targets. Only papers published in English were reviewed. The final reference list was generated on the basis of originality and relevance to the broad scope of this review.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 13 Jan 2020

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Hepatitis C
Economics
Hepatitis B
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health
Public Health
Qatar
Literature
Costs and Cost Analysis
Resource Allocation
Manuscripts
Cost Savings
Organized Financing
PubMed
MEDLINE
Hepatitis
Mortality
Incidence

Cite this

Hutchinson, S. (Accepted/In press). Global hepatitis C elimination: an investment framework. The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology.
Hutchinson, Sharon. / Global hepatitis C elimination: an investment framework. In: The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology. 2020.
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Hutchinson, S 2020, 'Global hepatitis C elimination: an investment framework', The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

Global hepatitis C elimination: an investment framework. / Hutchinson, Sharon.

In: The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 13.01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - SummaryThe World Health Organization (WHO) has set global targets for the elimination of hepatitis B and hepatitis C as a public health threat by 2030. However, investment in elimination programs remains low. To drive political commitment and catalyse domestic and international financing, we developed the first global investment framework for the elimination of hepatitis B and hepatitis C. This manuscript focuses on the hepatitis C investment framework. The work was accompanied by modelling demonstrating the cost of scaling up hepatitis C-specific elimination activities to meet WHO’s targets, considering both direct and indirect economic benefits. The investment framework outlines national and international activities that will enable reductions in hepatitis C incidence and mortality and identifies potential sources of funding and tools to help countries build the economic case for investing in national elimination activities. The modelling demonstrated how strengthening health systems, through improving workforce capacity and surveillance systems and integrating activities into universal health programs, can improve coordination and optimize resource allocation, making hepatitis C elimination cost-saving by 2027, with a net economic benefit of US$22.7 ($17.1-27.9) billion by 2030. This is the first global investment framework for hepatitis C elimination; it demonstrates a way forward for countries, particularly those with limited resources, to gain the substantial economic benefit and cost savings that come from investing in hepatitis C elimination. Funding: This work received funding from the Qatar Foundation as part of their support for the World Innovations Summit for Health, 2018. The funders had no role in the decision to publish or the preparation of the manuscript. This work received no NIH funding, and no authors are employed by NIH, or receipt funding from an NIH grant for this work.Search strategy and selection criteriaReferences published between 2010 and May 1, 2019 were identified through searches of PubMed, MEDLINE; EMBASE and grey literature, using the search terms “viral hepatitis”, “hepatitis C”, “prevention”, “testing”, “treatment”, “elimination”, “financing”, “economic modelling” and “cost-effectiveness”. In addition, we reviewed published case studies, reports and interviewed global experts including epidemiologists, clinicians, community advocates, public health experts and policymakers, to inform the framework and identify countries that have achieved viral elimination targets. Only papers published in English were reviewed. The final reference list was generated on the basis of originality and relevance to the broad scope of this review.

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M3 - Article

ER -

Hutchinson S. Global hepatitis C elimination: an investment framework. The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology. 2020 Jan 13.