Gender, childhood and consumer culture

Rachel Russell, Melissa Tyler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Book Abstract: Ordinary Lifestyles explores how popular media texts bring ideas about taste and fashion to consumers, helping audiences to fashion their lifestyles as well as defining what constitutes an appropriate lifestyle for particular social groups. Contemporary examples are used throughout, including Martha Stewart, House Doctor, What Not to Wear, You Are What You Eat, Country Living and brochures for gay and lesbian holiday promotions. The contributors show that watching make-over television or cooking from a celebrity chef's book are significant cultural practices, through which we work on our ideas about taste, status and identity. In opening up the complex processes which shape our taste and forge individual and collective identities, lifestyle media demand our serious attention, as well as our viewing, reading and listening pleasure.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOrdinary Lifestyles
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2005

Fingerprint

childhood
gender
holiday
VIP
collective identity
television
promotion
demand

Keywords

  • consumer culture
  • gender
  • childhood

Cite this

Russell, R., & Tyler, M. (2005). Gender, childhood and consumer culture. In Ordinary Lifestyles
Russell, Rachel ; Tyler, Melissa. / Gender, childhood and consumer culture. Ordinary Lifestyles. 2005.
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Russell, R & Tyler, M 2005, Gender, childhood and consumer culture. in Ordinary Lifestyles.

Gender, childhood and consumer culture. / Russell, Rachel; Tyler, Melissa.

Ordinary Lifestyles. 2005.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Russell R, Tyler M. Gender, childhood and consumer culture. In Ordinary Lifestyles. 2005