From danger and motherhood to health and beauty: health advice for the factory girl in early twentieth-century Britain

Vicky Long, Hilary Marland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A survey of government reports and the archives and journals of other agencies interested in industrial health in early twentieth-century Britain has led us to conclude that, in addition to apprehension about the potentially harmful impact of industrial work on the reproductive health of women, there was a great deal of interest in the health of young, unmarried girls in the workplace, particularly the factory. Adopting a broader time frame, we suggest that the First World War, with its emphasis on the reproductive health of women, was an anomalous experience in a broader trend which stressed the growing acceptability of women's work within industry.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)454-481
Number of pages27
JournalTwentieth Century British History
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

Keywords

  • women's history
  • twentieth-century Britain
  • health and beauty

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