Findings from the HSBC 2014 survey in Scotland : Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children, World Health Organization collaborative cross-national study (HSBC)

Candace Currie, Winfried van der Sluijs, Ross Whitehead, Dorothy Currie, Gill Rhodes, Fergus Neville, Jo Inchley

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

NHS Health Scotland are proud commissioners of the 7th Scottish Health Behaviours in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey. This high quality work provides the only means for comparing the health, wellbeing and social circumstances of children and young people in Scotland with those in 43 other countries and regions across Europe and North America.
Furthermore, the study provides trends over 25 years – tracking the outcomes which are improving and worsening with some authority.
The survey provides data for children and young people aged 11, 13 and 15 years across a wide range of topics, from wellbeing and health behaviours through to contextual factors such as peer relations and the school environment. It therefore
provides a hugely important dataset to allow the exploration of the causes, variation and inequalities in outcomes between and within countries over time.
This year’s report has again generated findings that are of great interest. For example, less than a fifth of respondents were found to be meeting the physical activity guidelines and around two-thirds spent two or more hours in front of a screen each weekday. Although fewer young people reported having experienced sexual intercourse, the proportion of those that did who used a condom may have decreased. However, other health behaviours are clearly improving, with the proportion
reporting that they brushed their teeth twice daily and the proportion reporting ‘excellent’ health increasing. Work is currently underway to consider the future survey landscape for children and young people in Scotland to ensure
that we make best use of the resources available. This work has already identified that having the ability to compare Scottish data internationally is important and valuable in helping us maximise the positive impact of research, policy and practice on the health and wellbeing outcomes for our children and young people.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationUniversity of St Andrews
PublisherChild and Adolescent Health Research Unit (CAHRU)
Commissioning bodyWHO Regional Office for Europe
Number of pages109
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2015

Keywords

  • Health behaviour in school-aged children (HBSC)
  • Scotland

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Findings from the HSBC 2014 survey in Scotland : Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children, World Health Organization collaborative cross-national study (HSBC)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this