Factors associated with changing alcohol consumption during the first UK lockdown

Kareena McAloney-Kocaman*, Kerri E. McPherson, Emily McGlinchey, Cherie Armour

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background
In response to COVID-19 there have been lockdowns and restrictions to hospitality services. Drinking behaviours often change in response to traumatic events and changes in the drinking environment, and this is influenced by a range of factors. This study explores self-reported changes in alcohol consumption in the third month of the UK lockdown, associations with socio-demographics factors and with COVID-19-related concerns, and mental health and wellbeing.

Methods
The COVID-19 Psychological Wellbeing Study was a longitudinal, online, three-wave survey of 1958 UK adults. Data were collected during the first UK lockdown; wave 1 launched 23 March 2020, wave 2 was 1 month after and wave 3 2 months after completion of wave 1A hierarchical multinomial regression model was estimated to investigate factors associated with changes in perceived alcohol consumption in the third month of the lockdown.

Results
The majority of participants reported changes in drinking (62%) with over one-third indicating increased consumption. Student status and worries about the financial implications of COVID-19 were associated with lower odds of decreased alcohol consumption. Those with above average income and those with children in the household had lower odds of increased alcohol consumption, while younger adults had higher odds of increased alcohol consumption.

Conclusions
This study adds to the growing body of research showing changes in alcohol consumption behaviours during the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions, and identifies risk and protective factors which can aid in targeting intervention at those most in need of support.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberckac124
JournalEuropean Journal of Public Health
Early online date12 Sep 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Sep 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Factors associated with changing alcohol consumption during the first UK lockdown'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this